Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,962   Posts: 1,558,317   Online: 999
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Pisa - IT -
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    41

    enlarger timer for color prints

    Hello,

    could you suggest me a very simple no red leds enlarger timer for color prints? with 2 or 3 memory positions to easly make burning in actions hopefully...

    thanx guys

  2. #2
    Lopaka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Michigan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    759
    Small pieces of black electrical tape will make the red leds disappear.

    Bob
    "I always take a camera, That way I never have to say 'Gee, look at that - I wish I had a camera'" -Joe Clark, H.B.S.S.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Pisa - IT -
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    41
    Hello Bob,

    with my philips timer (got 3 knobs for 10 seconds, single seconds and fractions of seconds) is not so simple 'cause when you are burning you got to discover black tape to change times and then cover again the knobs... I saw the paterson triple timer but it's a simple clock I guess...not a true enlarger timer!

    I need something like this paterson!

    massimiliano

  4. #4
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,200
    Black tape and either aim the timer away from the enlarger OR put a large piece of cardboard between the timer and enlarger OR both.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    420
    Images
    3
    I've found that the red LEDs don't really effect the paper at all, as long as you're not holding it directly in front of them for minutes at a time.

  6. #6
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,377
    Images
    4
    I think you will find most timers are safe with color materials as long as you keep them at a distance. A bit of ND filter (any dark bit of plastic would do) over the display will lessen the chances of fog. A cardboard flap, attached with a bit of tape, can flip down to cover the display when needed. Darkroom Automation has supplied timers with an extra switch for dousing safelights or safelights & the timer display.

    Darkroom Automation and RH sell timers that go through a sequence of exposures for main/dodge/burn exposures - allowing you to keep the display covered between exposures and removing any need to reset the timer's settings for the dodges and burns. Only RH sells timers in the EU at this time.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  7. #7
    fotch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    SE WI- USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,166
    I have used a Gralab with a hood made out of cardboard. The timer is a couple of feet higher than the easel and with the hood, no glow from the dial effects the paper.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  8. #8
    RH Designs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Yorkshire Dales, England
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    657
    Images
    18
    We use yellow leds on our timers because they are much safer for colour papers - the wavelength of the led light matches the dip in RA4 paper's sensitivity curve. The StopClock has ten steps of memory on each of two channels and will do what you want.
    Regards,
    Richard.

    RH Designs - My Photography

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Pisa - IT -
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    41
    Hello everybody,

    peraphs ilfochrome papers got fogged with much more ease than R4? I saw with interest that 2 great devices both from darkroom automation and rhdesigns. I'm a black 'n white printer and I would like to convert myself to f stop printing also experimenting with splitgrade but in my mind I associate these devices only with b&w (do not know why)...on the contrary I could use them also for ilfochrome printing I guess.

    Peraphs i'm going OFF TOPIC but WHICH ONE between these 2 alternatives should I use in your opinion so that I can also avoid fog problems with ilfochrome printing and, at the same time, converting myself to an fstop system with splitgrade capabilities??

    1. pyro meter + f stop timer (DA)
    2. stopclock professional (splitgrade capabilities) and zone master II (RHDESIGNS)

    Pyro meter got no "grey tone preview" (zone master II got it instead) but I could just use a stouffer half a stop steps stripe for every kind of paper to PREvisualize the tones, right?

    Help me to find the proper config for me.

    all the best,
    massimiliano

  10. #10
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,377
    Images
    4
    Well, if you are in Italy the choice is easy. Darkroom Automation doesn't sell timers in the EU, so you will have to use an RH timer. DA does sell meters world-wide, and they can be used with any timer - with the exception of an RH timer as the operating principles of the two systems are very different though the goals are the same.

    The easiest way to make a grey scale is indeed a step tablet. Grade 2 paper is usually 1/2 a stop per zone and a step tablet should provide a white->black grey strip in 10 steps. Higher grades of paper will only cover 5 steps: black, 3 grey tones and white. With an f-stop timer it is very easy to make a grey scale in, say, 1/5 th of a stop and return you back to the 10 zone scale.

    Even if you don't use a meter, or an f-stop timer, a grey scale for your paper is a very useful thing to have. You can use it to compare the tones in a test print to the tones on the grey scale - you can then make a very accurate guess how much exposure adjustment, dodging or burning is needed to go from the tones you have to the tones you want.

    Instructions are available at: http://www.darkroomautomation.com/support/zonestrp.htm
    Last edited by Nicholas Lindan; 08-15-2010 at 10:58 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin