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  1. #1
    Sean's Avatar
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    tiny dots on inside lens element =fungus?

    Hey just got my MF enlarging lens delivered this afternoon. A used componon-s 80mm, the lens is absolutely mint except on the bottom element inside it is slightly covered with tiny clear looking dots. You can see them if the lens is held directly to a light. Is this fungus? I'm thinking about having it professionally cleaned to remove these. I am also wondering should I learn how to clean lenses myself and what tools are required? I assume some device to unscrew the ring holding in the element? How risky is this assuming I only want to go 1 element deep and not take apart the entire lens?
    Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean
    Hey just got my MF enlarging lens delivered this afternoon. A used componon-s 80mm, the lens is absolutely mint except on the bottom element inside it is slightly covered with tiny clear looking dots. You can see them if the lens is held directly to a light. Is this fungus? I'm thinking about having it professionally cleaned to remove these. I am also wondering should I learn how to clean lenses myself and what tools are required? I assume some device to unscrew the ring holding in the element? How risky is this assuming I only want to go 1 element deep and not take apart the entire lens?
    Thanks
    It is more hassle than what it worth. I have a G Claron that has the same thing. I took it apart and put the lens elements in formaldehyde. Did not do a thing, and putting it back together was more hassle than what is was worth. Try using it, if the print comes out nice and crisp, forget about it. If you get image degradation, send it for cleanning.

    Of course, knowing you and how testa dura you are, all you need is a spanner wrench to take it appart. I recommend the ones from SK Grimes.

  3. #3
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    It might just be lens bubbles. When optical glass is manufactured sometimes very tiny bubbles form within the glass. I've seen them in enlarger lenses and also camera lenses including Leica glass which I use. If it is the bubbles it will have no effect on the image. Usually fungus forms spider like lines along the surface of the lens. Maybe somebody can correct me but I don't think fungus can form within an element. Bubbles are within an element. If they are bubbles usually there are only 2 or 3. If there are many more then it might be something else.

  4. #4
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    Does Carl Zeiss make fungicide?

    My buddy and I always had a saying...

    When we were 17 and working on our cars and something didn't fit quite right, one would say, "Gimme a hammer, I'll make it fit!"...

    I have no idea what fungus looks like on a lens. Feet, yeah! Lenses, no. Can you spray a lens with Tenactin?
    Fixer scented Glade; for those that just can't leave the darkroom.

  5. #5

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    I can't guess wether it's fungus or not, but I can tell you that the 80mm Nikkor I use has noticeable dust between the elements, I'm not sure if it's coated or not, and it still sharper than the 80mm schneiders I used in college (which are supposedly far superior than the Nikkors). I guess the lack of fingerprints in the front element is the main difference.

    My point is this: Print with it. You'll probably realize that it's as sharp as anything you can imagine. If you take the elements out however, you might screw up the spacing, or something like that, and do more harm than good.

    Whatever you decide to do, though, good luck!

  6. #6
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Small bubbles *in* the glass are fairly common, and are called "seeds".
    They most probaby have been there since day one.. and the lens was built and tested with them. I would *not* worry about them ... and trying to disassemble a lens is always accompanied by possible damage. One thing to be considered is the possiblity of trapping humid air between the elements - adding to the possiblity of fungus.
    So far, the fungus-affected lenses I've seen appear to have a randomly shaped "black cloud" internally. Something in appearance to a spider web would not surprise me a whole lot ... I have heard of those.

    The same advice given for any cleaning would apply: "If you can get by (consider results) by NOT doing it ... *DON"T*!!!






    .
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  7. #7
    Sean's Avatar
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    ok, I think I will leave it as is. The guy who sold it to me said he noticed no issues with it at all and was an avid MF B&W printer.

    So anyone know the sweetspot aperture number for a componon-s 80mm? thanks all

  8. #8
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    I like F/11.

  9. #9
    127
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    a camera lens of mine had SEVERE fungus. It typically appears as fine white lines starting at the edge of the lens, and trying to find their way to the centre. On the lens I had the fungus had reached the centre, phoned out for pizza, and was having a party with a bunch of friends.

    In the case of this lens the optical symptons were that light was being scattered, so contrast was reduced - anything dark against the skyline (like a building, or a person) ended up a couple zones lighter than it should be. A couple of otherwise good shots had to be saved by burning in.

    Your lens is probably no where near as bad as mine, and you're working in a more controlled situatuion, so you're probably just having to print with a bit more contrast to make up for it.

    If it is fungus, getting it proffesionally cleaned is relativly cheap IF you can find the right person to do it. I live literally round the corner from a repair shop - I've taken a few things in, and each time I've walked straight out again: everything seems to cost 70 pounds ($120!) before he'll look at it (which may be reasonable for skilled time, but makes repairing most things not cost effective).

    Fortunatly I bought a few things of ebay from a local camera dealer (he puts about 1000 things on ebay a week), and he passed it on to they guy he uses (which is no where near here!). I got it sorted for 20 pounds, which I think is great value. On the downside, I did have had a few glitches, and some stuff I've sent has had to go back for a second repair, but they were sorted under warranty without any problems. I know it's not much use to you in New Zealand, but if any UK'ers want details then PM me.

    Ian

  10. #10
    Leon's Avatar
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    i buy lots of cheap old cameras and lenses - many of which have some quite bad fungus. Try careful use of a lens wrench/ spanner (try microtools www.micro-tools.com/Merchant2/e_spanner.htm) to get it open then very gentle application of acetone nail polish remover with a lens tissue, allow to dry, repeat until its all gone. give a final VERY delicate clean with a tiny amount of windowlene (also known as windex i think) on a microfibre lens cloth, then put it back together. works for me.. Just be careful not to get any dust in it before you put it back together.

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