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  1. #21
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Maybe because it's the same person making selling them

    My guess is the red one's an improved version. He's said he'd look into a 7x5 version as well.

    Ian
    Note to self, get glasses checked.
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  2. #22
    DAP
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    I use a 4x5 film holder very similar to this one. Mine was apparently made in the 70's by phototherm (according to the guy I bought it from). It is made of stainless steel and fits in a standard 4 roll stainless steel developing tank. It must not have been a very big seller because it is the only one I have ever seen. The concept is pretty much exactly the same as this one (3 sheets bowed out on each side) - but the execution is a bit different. Long story short, I am very happy with the results I am getting from the phototherm (my only gripe with it is loading - but the plastic one this guy is selling looks like it would be easier to load). I imagine that this fellow's contraption would offer similar results. In any case it is a very nice alternative to the leaky square tanks or the extremely overpriced 4x5 Nikors if you want to do some daylight developing of 4x5 film.

  3. #23
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    If I has seen it before I bought a Jobo CPP 2 I would have considered it.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  4. #24

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    I bought one of these earlier this month (August). I was finally able to try it about a week ago and the results are outstanding. Since I already had a 3 reel Paterson, the ability to develop 4x5 in daylight without using a Yankee or other slosher tank was great. I never really had any luck with tray developing. Morgan O'Donovan's processing insert is a great advance in making 4x5 processing easier for the casual user.

  5. #25
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Has anyone tried to use one of these in a Paterson tank for rotary processing?
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #26
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Has anyone tried to use one of these in a Paterson tank for rotary processing?
    I have not, but I've thought about it pretty hard.

    A few years ago I posted this: http://photo.net/large-format-photography-forum/00RMar

    and this: http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/5...tml#post710121

    And when I first saw the eBay listing I sent the guy a message with the link saying I was very interested in his work.

    The most likely issue I see with the current design is that as the unit turns in fluid it will generate a lot of drag on the edges, especially the corners. The Phototherm design compensates by having a support bar there, as well as the fact that the film curl on the Phototherm places the film in a better circle so that the leading edge acts in a more knife-like fashion rather than a hydroplane.

    One issue Photohterm warns of with 120 film is that the rotating action of the processor can pull the film out of the grooves, so they have a little clip that holds the film tail in place. (Works great BTW.)

    The Phototherm 4x5 adapter handles this with the plastic frame bar that holds the leading edge of the film as it turns in the fluid.

    The current design on eBay - since it's not designed for rotary processing - doesn't take this into account. I expect that the film will come loose in the tank unless the rotation is pretty slow. I doubt it would take much more than two bands around the top and bottom edge to fix the problem (if it even is a problem), but that's more material and machining driving the cost up.

    I approached Phototherm a few years ago about producing their adapters for the hobby market. While they were interested, the final decision was that it wasn't profitable. They even offered to rent the molds to me so I could produce them myself, but after crunching numbers I didn't pursue it either. A production run large enough to get the cost down to my target of < 20USD, so that they could be sold for 25USD was around 10K units. Smaller production runs cost more per unit, obviously.

    Maybe the market has changed, and a higher production cost is feasible. And there's no harm in the fact that the guy on eBay has twice the volume capacity of the Phototherm unit. (6 sheets vs Phototherm's 4 sheets)

    As far as his plan to a 5x7 unit, I've done quite a bit of measuring, and you can easily interleave 2 sheets of 5x7 into the same volume. As for 8x10, an adapter that's properly made could fit two sheets of 8x10 into a Paterson 5 reel tank. But by then you're talking about a lot of fluid to slosh around. But one made for a Phototherm could do 2 sheets of 8x10 in an SSK8 tank.

    MB
    Last edited by michaelbsc; 09-01-2010 at 12:07 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: language clarification; add link
    Michael Batchelor
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    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Wilde View Post
    Looks like a combiplan holder adapted to a Paterson tank. The question to me is why.

    I am lucky enough to have about 8- 4x5 hanger holders, and a pair of tanks. One will hold 6 hangers and has a daylight light trap cover.

    I guess this thing would allow you to load the holder and then do the rest in a daylight tank. It sort of implies that you are shooting 4x5 and developing your own film without access to a darkroom, which seems a strange combination to me. The thought of loading such a holder and getting it into a tank in a changing bag seems to leave a lot to get snagged on something along the way.
    Well Mike, I agree that loading this thing in a changing bag looks like it would be a real PITA. But for me, tank processing offers advantages in temperature control that I just find too difficult to maintain when working with open trays. The ambient temperature of my darkroom varies wildly as the seasons change. With open trays, so does the developer temperature. With tank processing, it's an easy thing to set the whole works into a tempering bath. I'm currently using an HP CombiPlan tank for 4x5 sheet film and I'm happy with it. For those who don't already have or for some reason don't like that tank, this device could offer an alternative. It should use about the same amount of chemistry as the HP, and while it is a bit more than you might need in an open tray, it is not terribly excessive.
    Frank Schifano

  8. #28
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew_M View Post
    ... using a changing bag and daylight safe combi tank ...
    I don't even think a changing bag is required. While I'm lucky enough (meaning old and gray-haired) to have a small permanent darkroom, even in my youth I just loaded in a closet. I'm sure there are some who can't do this. But don't let lack of a changing bag stop you. Finding a dark place isn't that difficult.

    I have a changing bag, and if I need to do something while out and about it works. But I found the hall closet is dark, and far less confining.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  9. #29
    MaximusM3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelbsc View Post
    I don't even think a changing bag is required. While I'm lucky enough (meaning old and gray-haired) to have a small permanent darkroom, even in my youth I just loaded in a closet. I'm sure there are some who can't do this. But don't let lack of a changing bag stop you. Finding a dark place isn't that difficult.

    I have a changing bag, and if I need to do something while out and about it works. But I found the hall closet is dark, and far less confining.
    I load my Patersons in the wine cellar. No windows, light tight. Just ordered one of these. Thanks for the link.

  10. #30
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    He's said he'd look into a 7x5 version as well.
    What we really need is a 5x7 one

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