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  1. #11

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    I've had two fixtures of two each fluorescent tubes 4ft 40watt (5000K) in my darkroom for thirty-four years with no apparent problem. I also have an incandescent fixture on a separate switch as well as having each of the fluorescent fixtures on separate switches. I have two red safelights which probably "drown out" any after glow during printing. I use the incandescent light when doing pt/pd printing to avoid any uv from the fluorescent bulbs and to inspect prints during a printing session. If needbe you can get a reflector/socket with a spring clamp in a hardware store and use that when you don't need much light or to inspect prints while printing.

    http://jeffreyglasser.com/

  2. #12

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    Got a incandescent spot light that I use to check test strips some times,but usually step out side into the day light to judge them after a quick micro wave tanning bath to be more sure.

  3. #13

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    There have been post about this, seems like scootermm may have had a issue (12x20 film) where the after glow caused some fogging of film while loading. Maybe he will see this and refresh my memory or you could try a search and will bet you find something
    Mike C

    Rambles

  4. #14
    Reinhold's Avatar
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    Flourescent lighting has been discussed lots of times.
    It also gets a lot of fear mongering about afterglow.
    It's a non-issue when printing.
    It can be easily dealt with when developing film.

    Here are some previous threads:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/8...ing-light.html

    Another one:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum43/5...orescents.html

    Reinhold

    www.classicBWphoto.com

  5. #15
    Adrian Twiss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Casey Kidwell View Post
    Adrian, I'm just curious why you have so much illumination in your darkroom. Are you judging test strips and you want more even light for it?
    Firstly, thank you to all that posted. Your insights are much appreciated. My darkroom is a converted bedroom and I simply did not change the lights from the original fittings. They get so warm I leave them off whenever possible. When judging a test strip I use a 40w lamp clipped high up on one of my cupboards. I also have a 20 watt lamp in a clip on anglepoise lamp on my light box table. For colour print analysis (on the rare occasions I print in colour) I have a 100watt blue daylight lamp in another tall clip on anglepoise lamp. Nothing like keeping your options open eh?

  6. #16
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
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    All my domestic fluorescent lights have afterglow - both the mini/bulb type and the long standard tubes.

    I remember something on APUG a few months ago saying the UV glow lasting for up to 15 minutes

    I saw a very neat arrangement in someone’s darkroom of a cluster of small halogen bulbs arranged to illuminate the sink area to assess wet prints, the overall light level wasn’t that high but with the Halogens on the sink area was very well lit.
    There was a pull cord at the sink to switch the Halogens on and off.

    Martin

  7. #17
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    No matter what anyone says here, because your darkroom, paper, and darkroom geography are unique to you, you will only know if you TEST.

  8. #18

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    I have three 4 footers in my darkroom which I use only for sustained work in the light. My print judging light is incandescent and mounted in the fix area, over an angled piece of plexi, the voltage finessed to allow for "drydown" - a whole nother subject, don't get us started.
    The material point is that incandescents might be better for constant on and off application.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffreyg View Post
    II have two red safelights which probably "drown out" any after glow during printing.
    I doesn't really work that way. The safelights may "drown out" your ability to see the afterglow, but that doesn't mean it isn't there. Granted, it may not be enough to cause a problem, but you never know. It all depends on the intensity, the distance from your work, the sensitivity of the material, and the length of the exposure - just like anything else. My darkroom is very small, only 4.5 x 9 ft., and is illuminated with a single, bare bulb, 60 watt incandescent lamp. It is the only room that uses incandescent lamps at this point. I tried using a CF lamp in its place, but noticed that the afterglow was very apparent, and decided that maybe using one there wasn't the best idea I'd had that day.
    Frank Schifano

  10. #20
    Reinhold's Avatar
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    This is a repeat of my post back in 2003 on afterglow...

    "... Just for the heck of it, I took a reading of afterglow with a Pentax digital spot meter held up against a bare 4' warm white flourescent tube and took a reading within 5 seconds of turning it off (in my darkroom, of course).

    Wanna guess what it read??? Zeeeero.

    Ok, lets assume that the light was actually E.V. 0.9, and couldn't trigger the meter to respond with a positive reading. How long would a medium speed panchromatic film have to sit on a countertop (4 feet below the light) before it would show noticeable fog?...??

    Also... afterglow diminishes with time... I can't visually see any glow after a minute or so, even with eyes that are fully dark acclimated. When I process 400 speed film or Konica 750 IR film, I wait 2 minutes before opening the wrapper. Been doing it for nigh onto 30 years now...

    I routinely latensify film in the same room (using a #3 filter in a Kodak beehive safelight) for 16 minutes, and have yet to get even a hint of uncontrolled fogging from fluorescent lights.

    Afterglow is a not a bugbear in my darkroom..."

    Reinhold

    www.classicBWphoto.com

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