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  1. #41
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Vacuum food saver for storing opened film in the freezer:

  2. #42
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Rigid, high-flow, taco-style 4x5 sheet film developing cages?

    Made from Frost-King Gutter Guard plastic mesh. Supplied in 6-inch by 20-foot rolls, it's designed to act as a leaf filter over your rain gutters.

    It's a quarter-inch mesh that, when suitably trimmed down, can provide a perfect enclosure to allow processing solutions to access both the front and back sides of negatives. This is especially useful in facilitating the removal of anti-halation dye since it prevents the film back from being pressed against other sheets or the tank wall. It works much better than window screen for this because of the thicker gauge and much larger mesh openings.

    Just trim off a 5.75-inch length piece from the roll. Then trim the original width down from 6-inches to 5.5-inches. Set up a small flame of some sort. I used a small propane torch (burner) adjusted to the lowest flame. Gently and evenly pass the sharp trimmed edges of the mesh through the flame. They will quickly melt and recool, smoothing the sharp-edged cuts in the process.

    Then fold the mesh over along the length dimension and secure the edges using four small plastic cable ties. I used Thomas & Betts SF100-18XC ties because they are designed not to expose the sharp edges common to this class of product when the excess length is clipped off. Plus they are black, so they look cool.

    Voila! A chemically inert, reusable, taco-shaped protective cage for your negatives.

    I have found it extremely easy to load these cages in total darkness. The sheets slide in quickly and smoothly. And once inside, the film is completely protected. Three of these will comfortably fit into a 4-reel stainless steel developing tank, thus allowing you to use your regular inversion protocol if you wish. And keep you from having to spend US$200+ on a Nikor 4x5 tank...

    Ken
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails GutterGuard.jpg   Ties.jpg   MeshFilmCage.jpg  
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  3. #43
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    A (tested) 60-minute safe LED darkroom safelight?

    When I moved to try out variable contrast papers I decided I needed a universal red safelight. I already had a Thomas Duplex for which I had installed a custom designed Roscoe filter set for use with Kentmere Bromide graded papers. (Perhaps another post to this thread?) But I wanted something in red to be compatible with pretty much everything.

    After some looking about, I settled on an OptiLED 627nm S-11 style bulb. Holding a CD disc up to view the light generated by this bulb I noticed there were a few minor spikes in the blue and green portions of the spectrum also visible. Not intense, but still visible.

    I always keep a few sheets of Rubylith and Amberlith around, so I grabbed a piece of Rubylith and filtered the light. Looking again at the CD showed absolutely no dangerous spikes, at least visible to the naked eye. There was only a small reduction in overall brightness using the filter.

    So I cut a 3x13-inch piece of plywood, painted it flat black, and attached four tiny neodymium magnets to the bottom. These magnets were rescued from old SonicCare toothbrush heads destined for the trash. (I always save these guys. They're incredibly powerful and useful.)

    Then I ran to the local hardware store and purchased six cheap, plastic E-26 bulb sockets, which I mounted in line on the top of the plywood. I wired the sockets together, attached a short line plug, screwed in the LED bulbs, and covered the entire assembly with a smooth rollover of Rubylith held in place with opaque black photography tape.

    The magnets allow me to securely mount the strip right on top of my sheet metal Thomas Duplex. This places the bulbs about seven inches below a white acoustical ceiling. The six filtered LEDs give off a surprising amount of light, which is then reflected off the ceiling throughout the darkroom.

    I then performed the classic pre-fogged safelight test on my enlarging easel using Ilford MGIV RC. I tested at five minute intervals for 12 intervals, or 60 minutes total. When processed the test showed absolutely no evidence of safelight fog out to the 60 minute mark. I'm not sure how far I could have gone, but 60 minutes seemed more than sufficient.

    Ken
    Last edited by Ken Nadvornick; 09-27-2010 at 12:47 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  4. #44
    ozphoto's Avatar
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    I use one of these to remove the excess air from my mixed developer:
    http://www.vacuvin.com/Vacuum_Wine_S...6_270_267.html

    My partner rarely leaves a bottle of red unfinished, so don't need them for their intended use!!

  5. #45
    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
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    Talking timers. They are the duck's guts.

  6. #46
    Alistair Wait's Avatar
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    I am enjoying this thread, thanks.
    I would be a rare thing in the world of analogue photography if there were many questions that have never been asked before, or many improvisations that have not been tried.
    I have often dreamt a lens turret would be a great addition to my favourite enlarger but I am yet to stumble on one. Recently I had an idea to build one and started searching for the plans. After many clicks through Google I came across a reference in an old Popular Science magazine from January 1948. On reading this thread I have gone back to it to see what more I could find.
    Here is a link to a 'Google Books' search I did on 'photography' in Popular Science that has heaps of back issues going back to the 30's. It is fun to click through.

    Cheers
    http://www.google.co.nz/search?q=pho...Q&start=0&sa=N

  7. #47
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
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    Some very interesting historical browsing there, thanks for posting this link.
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  8. #48
    Terrence Brennan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    Vacuum food saver for storing opened film in the freezer:
    I do the same, except I put five rolls of 35mm film, in film cans, in a 1.33L milk bag and seal it with a vacuum food saver. It's great when you use this rig to keep film cool in the summer, as when you take the five rolls out to warm them up, the condensation forms on the bag, not on the film cans.

  9. #49
    bowzart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nikola Dulgiarov View Post
    I made my own enlarger footswitches ( one for the timer, and one for a "Bulb" duration) out of some blocks of wood, 3mm plywood, and duct tape, and a magnetic stirrer from a computer fan and super magnets.
    I used a telegraph key for a footswitch for quite a long time. My father had had a stint as a telegraph operator in the late 1930's, when the telegraph key was a mainline communication tool. It was a sturdy one, made of brass bar stock.

  10. #50
    Marco B's Avatar
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    I build an improvised light proof paper drying box for drying hand-coated liquid emulsion silver gelatine paper. It uses an ordinary darkroom tray with a home build lid of foam board, mat board and gaffer tape, and has active air flow using three computer ventilators.

    See the images. Full build info here:

    http://www.boeringa.demon.nl/menu_te...rdryingbox.htm







    My website

    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

    "Analog is chemistry + physics, digital is physics + math, which ones did you like most?"

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