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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by patrickjames View Post
    These are the best type of plastic print tong. I break off the locking tab to make them more friendly.

    http://www.freestylephoto.biz/5101-A...Tongs-Set-of-2

    I know what you mean about the Kostiner SS tongs. The only way to get those away from me would be to pry them from my cold dead hands!
    I like these too. I might snap off those locks also. There very annoying

  2. #12
    eddym's Avatar
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    I've used bamboo tongs, plastic tongs with rubber tips, and SS tongs without rubber tips. The latter were awful. Without the tips, the print would just slip right out, and sometimes they would scratch the emulsion. I still have a couple of the plastic tongs, and they work great. I needed to replace a couple, but couldn't find them, so went back to the bamboo tongs. They are OK, but the bamboo tends to come loose from the plastic thingie that holds them together.

    Never thought of using nitrile gloves! I might just try that next time I print!
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

  3. #13
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    My experience has been that tong, regardless of the manufacturer or type, a excellent tool to mark or damage prints. The best tools are you hands either with or without nitrile gloves.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  4. #14
    clayne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    My experience has been that tong, regardless of the manufacturer or type, a excellent tool to mark or damage prints. The best tools are you hands either with or without nitrile gloves.

    Steve
    Sorry, i like not being allergic to my developer.

    The arista plastic tongs work great and they rarely ever damage a print. Sure if you're printing 16x20 regularly, tongs might not be for you - although you better be pumping out masterpieces.

    Other than that, why care about an indentation to the border area of a print? It doesn't affect the image or even take away from it.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  5. #15
    Maris's Avatar
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    Bamboo tongs with soft rubber tips are very effective. They grip paper securely without emulsion damage and the bendy bamboo means you can't grip too hard. I use two tongs with different colours for every darkroom session. One goes only into the developer, the other only touches stop-bath and fixer and I never interchange the two. That way there is no adverse contamination of the processing solutions or tong-marks or stains on the photographs.

    Nearly fifty years ago I decided to become a "tong expert" and avoid all skin contact with processing solutions; this mainly to avoid causing finger marks on expensive gelatin-silver paper. Remember, even the faintest trace of fixer on a finger tip will cause permanent white marks on the photograph and it will go in the trash. I tried gloves but they were worse than bare hands because I could not feel traces of contamination. And having to wash your hands or gloves a hundred times during a darkroom session sure slows you down.

    Practice makes perfect (or near to it) and these days I reckon I could do a day in the darkroom while wearing a white dinner suit and not get a spot. It is a clean and pleasant way to work. Sure, I've watched people make photographs while elbow-deep in processing solutions and somehow they get by but I'm not that tough.
    Photography, the word itself, invented and defined by its author Sir John.F.W.Herschel, 14 March 1839 at the Royal Society, Somerset House, London. Quote "...Photography or the application of the Chemical rays of light to the purpose of pictorial representation,..". unquote.

  6. #16

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    Stainless steel tongs I inherited 40+ years ago still going strong. They nicely pick up prints off flat bottom trays.

    Bamboo ones are ok if you pukk off the rubber tip and sharpen the sticks. Otherwise they stink.

    Cheap gloves for large prints. Pick up a corner with stainless and use two hands.

  7. #17
    jeroldharter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    My experience has been that tong, regardless of the manufacturer or type, a excellent tool to mark or damage prints. The best tools are you hands either with or without nitrile gloves.

    Steve
    Ditto. I can't stand tongs and haven't used them for years. They are tools for marring prints. I just threw out several bamboo tongs this afternoon, unused.

    I use single tray processing so tongs are not necessary anyway. If I batch process, I use nitrile gloves.
    Jerold Harter MD

  8. #18
    ozphoto's Avatar
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    I too use the bamboo ones - but slightly more expensive at $13/set. Think I'll check out the local kitchen store when they need replacing.
    My last set lasted forever until the rubber started to leave their waffle pattern on my lovely white borders when lifting from the fixer. :O

    Simply threw them away and started afresh - 2nd set in over 15 years - must be doing something right . . . . .

  9. #19
    Obtong's Avatar
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    I really like the Paterson print tongs. They are plastic, durable, and don't appear to leave marks on the prints. I often wonder if the bamboo absorbs the chemicals. Plastic tongs are easy to clean.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by eddym View Post
    I've used bamboo tongs, plastic tongs with rubber tips, and SS tongs without rubber tips. The latter were awful. Without the tips, the print would just slip right out, and sometimes they would scratch the emulsion. I still have a couple of the plastic tongs, and they work great. I needed to replace a couple, but couldn't find them, so went back to the bamboo tongs. They are OK, but the bamboo tends to come loose from the plastic thingie that holds them together.

    Never thought of using nitrile gloves! I might just try that next time I print!
    Stick a little Gorilla Glue in the plastic thingie and shove the bamboo back in. As the glue dries, it expands and sticks like all get out. they'll never come out again. I guarantee it.
    Frank Schifano

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