Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,963   Posts: 1,558,384   Online: 759
      
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31
  1. #1
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,421
    Images
    2

    In-line thermometer

    Hey y'all,

    So I'm redoing my darkroom, and so far everything is much improved. I'm setting it up in my laundry room and I'm using the W/D hookups to do so. This is a great way to setup a darkroom w/o needing dedicated water hookups. I'd be glad to discuss how, and it's quite easy with the right plumbing.

    Anyways, I'm hoping to get a little fancier this time around and I'd love to include an in-line thermometer.

    I'm not opposed to spending $30 or so and getting a new one, but I'd rather explore the DIY possibilities first.

    Here is one idea from the brewing circles, and although it wouldn't be dreadfully accurate, it'd probably be good enough for non-critical black & white work.

    http://www.forrestwhitesides.com/node/44

    And here is a more taylor-made solution, but it uses the same mechanism (those stick-on thermometers from the pet store)

    http://www.breworganic.com/thrumomet...ermometer.aspx

    Anyways, I think that with our powers combined, we could develop a more sophisticated and affordable solution.

    Cheers!

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Winnipeg, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,301
    Drill hole in faucet spout, insert one of these $6 specials, secure with some sort of glue. They work like a charm.

    http://www.harborfreight.com/instant...ter-95382.html

  3. #3
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,421
    Images
    2
    That's certainly a thought that I had. And luckily I have a rubber tube for my last stretch, so it'd be as easy as an ice-pick and some super glue probably.

    However, I just came across these.... which would be a fairly elegant solution.

    http://www.allproducts.com/manufactu.../product5.html

    These are going for fire-sale prices on eBay. The only concern is +/-1°C from 22-50° and +/-2° outside of that range. However, once the "slop" was established, it'd be pretty reliable.

    Hmm, maybe not such a brain buster afterall...

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Tacoma, WA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    560
    Or you could put in a T-Joint, get an End-cap drill a hole in it large enough to accomodate a dial thermometer and glue it in. It would be hard to make one that didn't leak though.

  5. #5
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Misissauaga Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,939
    Images
    29
    As long as there is not a lot of downline back pressure, I have just taken a dial thermometer and inserted it in the almost horizontal section of the facuet head that to downstrem of the two valves.

    I wrapped the junction where the stem of the thermometer goes into the faucet line with tape to cut down on the leaks.

    I use self amalagamating electrical insulating tape.

    The nice side effect of this connection is that you are able to twist the whole thing.

    I usually twist it so that the water flow I am looking to acheive points the indicator needle straight up.

    Thne a glance, without reading the dial calibrations tells you what adjustment is needed.
    my real name, imagine that.

  6. #6
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI U.S.A.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,557
    Images
    3
    These alt. methods re: drilling holes and gluing give me the willies. I hope none ever fail while you're on vacation.
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  7. #7
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,421
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by bobwysiwyg View Post
    These alt. methods re: drilling holes and gluing give me the willies. I hope none ever fail while you're on vacation.
    I agree, and that's why any modification I make will be after the main on/off valve
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  8. #8
    Paul VanAudenhove's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    350
    Seems to me I saw a neat DIY version using a T and a dial thermometer someplace. The length of the pipe was sized to the length of the dial thermometer probe. If I recall it correctly, the end used a washer fitting with a rubber cork that the thermometer went through. Then, it was screwed in place by another washer fitting, holding the stopper in. It didn't look like it would leak.

  9. #9
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,421
    Images
    2
    Paul, I'm having trouble visualizing exactly how the cork was screwed in place, but I can kinda imagine it and it sounds very good.

    Are you a good artist, can you draw a picture?

    Something like this sounds very robust indeed..

  10. #10
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Chicago
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,631
    Images
    152
    I'm doing a similar thing. I had a used mixing valve that went bad so now I'm getting a new one from a plumbing supply store. After the mixer and shut off, I'm thinking of running an tee joint somewhere after the shutoff and getting a thermometer with NPT thread on it (just bought one on ebay for $20), This way I can plug in the thermometer into one of the legs of the tee and just run the water out the other leg.

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin