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Thread: Omega D-II

  1. #21

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    Thanks, David, for the website. I will check it out. I am not only a newbie to this community, but, relatively speaking, I am still a greenhorn to the darkroom (maybe 500 hours booked over the past 5 years). Now that I have my own DII and darkroom equipment, I hope to book a lot more hours. I am in the process of learning as much as I can about -- this website is a great place for me to hang out to learn from the veterans and other young bucks.

    I'm still looking for three main items on ebay: a safelight, contact printer, and 3 print frames: 4x6, 7x5, and 8x10. Is "print frame" the right term? I think I have also heard print frames (the metal paper holders that are used to get a white edge on the print while you burn the image) called by different names. Is there an official term? Would love to hear anyone's 2 cents.

    Huram

  2. #22
    dr bob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huram
    I think I have also heard print frames (the metal paper holders that are used to get a white edge on the print while you burn the image) called by different names. Is there an official term? Would love to hear anyone's 2 cents.

    Huram
    The term is "easel". They come in various sizes and shapes and purposes. I'd recommend an 8x10 two-blade as a starter with an 11x16 for future use. Of course one can use the 11x16 to do any size paper or format.
    I love the smell of fixer in the morning. It smells like...creativity!
    Truly, dr bob.

  3. #23

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    So far, I have not been a big fan of the easels with the sliding arms -- I like the ones that are set specifically for 4x6 or 7x5 -- you simply slide that dimension paper in under the frame, and get a "perfect" frame ever time. Are these called "easels" as well?

  4. #24

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    Just a couple of thoughts Huram......

    Contact printer - I have found that my piece of glass from the local auto glass store cost me less than $10. They made it to my size specs and did whatever they do for the edges to be safe. Just a thought......

    Easel - I used to have troubles with the 4 bladed easel too. Now I have the back of old work prints marked up with lines for where to set the blades. It takes a little bit of time to make the sheets, but well worth it.

    Good luck!!

    and by the way, I have always used an Omega D2. It was my dad's and is now mine and sentimental attatchment aside, I really like using it.

  5. #25
    DKT
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huram
    I like the ones that are set specifically for 4x6 or 7x5 -- you simply slide that dimension paper in under the frame, and get a "perfect" frame ever time. Are these called "easels" as well?
    those would be called "speed easels". speed-ez used to be a popular brand. the manufacturer, saunders, makes a nicer version of these, with a hinged frame (3/16th or so border all around) in a preset size. There's a 5x7 Saunders model with a removable bar that sits off-center. You can leave this in place and get a 3.5x5 and 4x5. Pop it out, get a 5x7. The speed-ez's, come in all sorts of sizes from wallet up through 20x24. They're yellow--slide the paper in either side. These can be kind of cheaply made--they get warped pretty easily, don't hold the paper flat all the time, and they can be hard to get the paper centered accurately for an even border. But they're cheap....

    a "4-in-one" easel might be worth looking at--premier, kalt, costar etc all make these. you get a preset 2x3, 3x5, 5x7 and 8x10 on the back. These are pretty cheap too, and you oughta be able to find a used one easily.

    btw-I do have an Omega handbook from the late 50s, that covers some of these earlier ones & has all the condenser set info, plus the various lens board dimensions etc. I think you can pretty much use the D2 instructions though--the two models are slightly different, but it's a pretty easy beast to learn how to use.

  6. #26

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    Thanks, Yeah-Yeah and DKT, for the info. Very, very helpful for me in my search to get a few goodies for the darkroom. I think the best way for me is to buy all of this in a "darkroom lot" on Ebay -- I'll keep my eyes out and be patient. Maybe I can find all I am looking for in one "lot" so I don't have to keep paying for an arm and a leg on the shipping end. (Don't you just hate when you buy something on ebay, and the shipping is acutally more than your final bid?) Grrrr . . . .

    Yeah, the Granz Speed Easel is what I was thinking about. I have used their yellow frames quite a bit. It is good to actually now figure out the name of those tools that I have been using for all of these years!! I am a bonehead.

    Oh yeah, I also went to the Classic-Enlarger webpage. Great info on every Omega Enlarger. Go to the "Ask Harry" forum and learn a tons on Omega enlargers.

    Well, that should about do it. I think I have found out all the answers to the questions I have been looking for (for the time being). Thanks for all the help!!

    Peace,

    Huram

  7. #27
    David Ruby's Avatar
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    I'd at least try to get them to throw in one lens! Couldn't hurt right. I think the guy I bought mine from was selling the enlarger alone for $100.

    I got my DII setup at a garage sale for $350, with 50mm Schnieder Componen S, 150 Schnieder Componen S (which you'll need for the 4x5 enlargements), negative carriers for 35mm, 6x6 and 4x5, a Kearsarge digital Timer, Four 8x10 trays, contrast filters, and all the accessories to work with the different lenses. You'll need a cone for the 150mm lens. I think that was all. Oh yeah, i also got a device to level out all the necessary pieces and parts, and he through in a bunch of old paper and odds and ends. You gotta love those garage sales!

  8. #28
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    I went back today and gave the enlarger a better more informed look over. Everything seemed to move fine, though the up/down motion was a lttile stuff and could probably benifit from a little lubrication. Light worked, and the bellows looked well enough that if there are holes, thay would be easily fixable with an elmer's/acrylic mixture.

    One point of possible concern though. I removed the condensor and gave it a look. Seems to be the 4x5 one by what I was told here, however there was a rather large chip missing from it along the edge on the lamphouse side of it. Would this cause any adverse effects? I looked through the condensor from the film side and wasn't able to see the chip from that direction. Would that indicate that it wouldn't effect anything? Also, ATM there are no lensboard/cones included, but the guy is going to look around in their storage for them and get back to me. Think I should I try to get them to come down on price a bit if they can't find any?

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    I'd stick to modern 6-element designs like Schneider Componon-S, Rodagon, or the 6-element EL-Nikkors (or the Apo-Componon and Apo-Rodagon, if you have the budget).
    Is that to say there is a non 6-element EL-Nikkor that I should make sure I'm not buying by accident?

  10. #30
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    The 75mm EL-Nikkor is a 4-element lens, but it's pretty good. I had one for a while, and the contrast was excellent. I didn't think it was worth the trouble to upgrade to a regular 6-element lens like a Rodagon or Componon-S, but eventually I got a good deal on a 90mm Apo-Rodagon and sold off the 75.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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