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  1. #1

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    Problem with reels

    Hi,

    I'm not sure if this is the right forum for this question as I'm not sure what part of my image supply chain is having issues. My last couple rolls have ghost images of sprocket holes on them as shown in the attached image. I wound the rolls on Hewes reels. This only the second pair of rolls I've developed. The first did not have this issue. Any idea what could be causing this? Many of the frames have these sprocket holes overlays but in different parts of the frame.

    Edit: I originally said last couple but only one of the rolls exhibited the sprocket hole problem below. The other role had severe fogging in some frames though. Since my changing bag is small I load the first roll in the tank. Then open the bag and remove the empty cansiter while putting in the second canister. I then close the bag and load the second roll.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails examplesprockets.jpg  
    Last edited by davide; 01-20-2011 at 11:32 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2
    David William White's Avatar
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    The image is sharp so you definitely had film in contact with film, but if this was done on a reel, I don't get the geometry. Did you examine how nicely the reel was loaded after you pulled it from the tank?
    Considerably AWOL at the present time...

    Archive/Blog: http://davidwilliamwhite.blogspot.com

  3. #3

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    Thanks for the quick reply. It appeared to be loaded fine when I unspooled it, but I did it too quickly to tell for sure. I am using the Hewes reels with prongs. Could this have occurred from catching the sprockets unevenly on the prongs (so the first sprocket and the left side and the second sprocket on the right side are on the prongs)? Or maybe from winding too tightly?

  4. #4

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    Looks like 2 layers of film sprockets exposed on top of your image. They also look parallel to each other quite a distance from the edge, not angled as they would be if not loaded correctly. Could low light exposure have happened at loading/unloading the camera or loading the reel before processing? As it's on 2 rolls processed separately it could be your procedure. It can't be strong light piping through the cassette mouth velvet as the film can't move apart by that amount. Looks like you need to do a few tests.

  5. #5

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    Maybe my light was getting in through one of the hand holes in the light bag? I wear latex gloves when I use the bag and it's sometimes hard to get my hands in and out.

  6. #6
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davide View Post
    Maybe my light was getting in through one of the hand holes in the light bag? I wear latex gloves when I use the bag and it's sometimes hard to get my hands in and out.
    That seems reasonably possible.

    I always try to wear long sleeves, and get them under the sleeves of the darkbag, which I then push up as far as possible on my arms (above the elbows).

    I don't trust em as far as I can throw 'em!
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  7. #7

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    Why are you using latex gloves in the dark bag anyway? There is really no need for it. And yes, you should get your arms in there up to your elbows
    Frank Schifano

  8. #8
    MattKing's Avatar
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    If you are worried about fingerprints, cotton gloves are a better idea.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  9. #9

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    I assumed that the gloves would protect the film from fingerprints. They ended up just making it very hard to do anything by restricting my sense of touch.

  10. #10

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    It almost looks like a light leak from taking the empty canister out of the changing bag when getting ready to work on the second reel. That's my first impression. It is clear though - one on the front of the cat and two in front of the back leg of the cat; that makes me think it could be the cut off leader in addition to a light leak that caused it. That would imply technique in my opinion. But testing in controlled, step by step, room lights on, room light off-type procedures would be needed. If you cut the leader off, and had to take your hands out of the changing bag for something, that could explain one possible light leak. Just trying to throw ideas out here to be considered.

    I suppose your changing bag could be going bad too. Was it washed in with some kind of detergent?
    Tim Flynn

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