Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,937   Posts: 1,585,638   Online: 773
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 38
  1. #11
    winger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Page County, IA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,505
    Images
    47
    #1 can remove fingerprints - don't ask how I know. They do come back.
    At the lab, we tended to use the same bottle for the same thing so didn't put a huge effort into cleaning them. We scrubbed with a commercial glassware cleaner then rinsed with alcohol.

    An autoclave just melts stuff that can't take the temp and kills organisms. It wouldn't get rid of chemical leftovers.

  2. #12
    Barry S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    DC Metro
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,264
    Images
    31
    Jeff-- There's no need to get crazy here. The rigorous cleaning methods outlined above aren't necessary for general photographic purposes. Even in my career as a research scientist--there were only certain circumstances that required intensive glassware cleaning. I suggest a mild residue-free detergent like LIQUI-NOX. These kinds of detergents generally do a great job for most uses. I (and most wet plate practitioners) use a motley assortment of glassware for wet plate with no ill consequences. If you have any glassware with visible mineral deposits, you could do a mild acid wash before the detergent rinse.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,012
    We used to use a product called Decon 90. It was extremely alkaline. It cleaned well, but there are probably residues that it would not work on. For example, a deposit of calcium compounds can be better removed with acid.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,021
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Did I mention HCl? No, I did not.

    It is not used due to the extreme odor.

    PE
    No, you did not mention it. But will it work? When I did construction, I used that stuff outdoors all the time to etch concrete, and the odor was certainly manageable if handled properly. If the chemical will do the trick, perhaps soaking the glassware in a covered container outside would work for Jeff.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  5. #15
    Ross Chambers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Blue Mountains NSW Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    703
    Must not be flippant, must not be flippant...

    Why do I think of "Breaking Bad" when I read this thread? I'm sloppy, hot water and detergent, but that's from ignorance, not knowledge and experience. Interesting information.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    142
    I would say that the appropriate method is to identify what you have to clean and then use the appropriate solvent. Diluted sulfuric acid works great for me in the darkroom for the annual cleaning.

  7. #17
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,558
    Images
    65
    HCl will work, but since it is about 0F here right now, it does tend to escape my mind due to the need for outdoors work.

    It is also not commonly used in labs for cleaning. The potency changes with time.

    The cleaning methods I mentioned are designed to remove encrusted residues of all types and to oxidize (with dichromate) anything that might be there that might be "harmful". I use the dichromate/sulfuric acid method as one step in cleaning glass plates.

    PE

  8. #18
    Rick A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    north central Pa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,251
    Images
    34
    I used to use "Polident to clean my slot processor between batches of chems. It may take a couple of doses, but if you follow the package instructions, it works well. And, NO, I dont have false teeth, my BFF used to clean his labware with the stuff, and it would sparkle. Oh, and it smells minty fresh.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    florida
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,186
    Images
    2
    I suggest using eye protection when handling the above mentioned chemicals.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  10. #20
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,558
    Images
    65
    Gloves, eye protection, lab smock and old clothes and shoes!

    PE

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin