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  1. #21
    Jeff Bannow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Method 1. Make a saturated solution of Potassium Dichromate in concentrated Sulfuric Acid. Soak your glassware in this for a few days and then rinse with copious running water.
    How much of each? I assume I can reuse this solution (pour it from one container to another?)
    - Jeff (& sometimes Eva, too) - http://www.jeffbannow.com

  2. #22
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    It can be reused.

    I use battery acid, which is about 35% H2SO4. I use enough Dichromate to make a saturated solution with some Dichromate on the bottom. Then I use the liquid and as I use up the liquid, I pour in more acid gradually using up the solid in the bottom, so I keep my original mix fresh and "going" and re use the used material stored in another bottle. When it appears grungy, I pour it out or better still, add some fresh thereby replenishing it.

    PE

  3. #23

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    and shoes!
    That rules me out.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry S View Post
    Jeff-- There's no need to get crazy here. The rigorous cleaning methods outlined above aren't necessary for general photographic purposes. Even in my career as a research scientist--there were only certain circumstances that required intensive glassware cleaning. I suggest a mild residue-free detergent like LIQUI-NOX. These kinds of detergents generally do a great job for most uses. I (and most wet plate practitioners) use a motley assortment of glassware for wet plate with no ill consequences. If you have any glassware with visible mineral deposits, you could do a mild acid wash before the detergent rinse.
    Listen to this man! . No need for craziness, indeed. For the very dirtiest of labware: Hot water and dish detergent, followed by a thorough scrub with 'Bar Keepers Friend' (contains oxalic acid), followed by a good rinse with hot tap water. Sometimes I'll follow with a last rinse in distilled water with a splash of Everclear, but then I just feel foolish about the overkill!

    d

  5. #25
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    As asked in the OP "can I contaminate my chemistry through trace amounts of things that won't wash out?" and the answer is "YES" and I have given the best remedies for this. It will clean out all unknowns.

    Under normal conditions in my lab, I KNOW what is there and based on that I use detergent, a rough sponge and hot water. This is a different situation than described in the quote from the OP.

    And, there are all levels in between.

    PE

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    I use... a neutralizing solution.... (Carbonate) in case of an acid spill.

    PE
    What strength?

  7. #27
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Ray;

    It does not matter. You can use solid carbonate powder (crystals) for a spill of acid on the floor.

    PE

  8. #28

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    Can you describe the whole process?
    The use of that cleaning mixture is well known and even appears in kodak publications.
    The clean up procedure for accidents however is apperaently a bit more well hidden.

    Are you saying you would use a sat. solution for spills on flesh but the powder for the floor?
    What would prudent subsequent measures look like ?
    (rags and paper towels-in the kitchen/lab trash bag?
    or down the toilet?)

    How would baking soda fare in case of a spill, in the absence of washing soda?

  9. #29
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    Ray;

    Use Washing Soda on the floor if you wish either saturated or solid. Use Baking Soda on skin dilute and lots of running water. The H2SO4 I buy is 35 - 37% and comes with instructions for a spill on it.

    The solid fizzes and foams and after finishing, you will have a mushy solid that can be flushed down a toilet much like you run the detergent or Washing Soda down the toilet. It can harm septic systems though due to high salt content.

    Any and all of what you suggest is possible if your local disposal system can handle it.

    I suggest that NO ONE use concentrated H2SO4 for any purpose. It is TOO DANGEROUS! Even cleaning drains is fraught with danger. Any porcelain container can crack and water can boil if you add conc H2SO4 to them. Spatter and fumes can then create a mess.

    PE

  10. #30

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    Good advice.

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