Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,276   Posts: 1,534,787   Online: 822
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 26
  1. #11
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    the villages .centralflorida,USA and Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,457
    Images
    1
    Why not just a steel plate and a few magnets to hold the paper down? It's very cost effective and flexible solution, and it is easy to store. I trim all prints after drying anyway. This gets rid of the chemical-penetrated edges which are hard to wash clean.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  2. #12
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Stratford-upon-Avon, England
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,413
    I am going to say something really obvious but here goes anyway - Large Easels are heavy and take up lots of room

    If you are a printer who frequently print a wide range of paper sizes then a single Easel is the way to go

    However, if you frequently print a smaller size but might like occasionally to print up to 20x16 then you might be better with a pair of easels - the first for your standard print size and a 20x16 as the second unit

    If your Darkroom has lots of room then size won't be a problem but if it’s a bit on the snug side then the size of a 20x16 easel can easily become an issue.

    For my part I have a 20x16 4 Blade Kaiser – and it’s a lovely piece of kit.
    It is also large, heavy and unwieldy and frankly a PITA when printing 10x8 or 11x14

    Martin

  3. #13
    hpulley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,214
    Images
    75
    I like to have a few easels so it is simpler to switch paper sizes. I have a Saunders 11x14 4-blade that does 5x7 (or 4x6), 8x10 and 11x14 but I will often use a 2-blade 8x10 LPL as it is just easier to wield at times.
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

    Happiness is...

  4. #14
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    the villages .centralflorida,USA and Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,457
    Images
    1
    I see, I'm pretty much alone with my no-need-for-an-easel concept. This surprises me, because I adopted the concept after visiting several master printers and observing them doing the same. To name a few: Ansel Adams (taped the paper to the wall), John Sexton (uses dusted double adhesive tape on a wooden board) and Howard Bond (using weights to hold the edges down on a wooden board). I revised the concept slightly by using a thin steel panel on top of the baseboard and magnets or magnetic strips to hold the paper in place.

    What's the big thing about an easel? What am I missing?
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  5. #15
    hpulley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,214
    Images
    75
    How do you weight down the four sides of fiber paper? My Ilford fiber wants to curl up and I'm not sure weights in the corners would be sufficient.

    I need a bigger baseboard or should just bold the column to the table but neither of my enlargers has even an 11x14" base let alone 16x20" so the use of an easel lets me use larger paper.

    I can also crop the image using the blades but I suppose if you always compose and frame your shots properly then there is no need to crop them.
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

    Happiness is...

  6. #16
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    the villages .centralflorida,USA and Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,457
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by hpulley View Post
    How do you weight down the four sides of fiber paper? My Ilford fiber wants to curl up and I'm not sure weights in the corners would be sufficient. ...
    My magnets are strong enough to do that, but I also carefully run the paper along the edge of the workbench to straighten most of the natural curl.

    Quote Originally Posted by hpulley View Post
    ... I need a bigger baseboard or should just bold the column to the table but neither of my enlargers has even an 11x14" base let alone 16x20" so the use of an easel lets me use larger paper. ...
    My enlarger is wall-mounted. Anyway, the steel plate is strong enough to overlap a small baseboard and still stay straight.

    Quote Originally Posted by hpulley View Post
    ... I can also crop the image using the blades but I suppose if you always compose and frame your shots properly then there is no need to crop them.
    I crop the print after processing with a knife and a steel ruler just prior to mounting.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  7. #17
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Chicago
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,627
    Images
    151
    If you are only occasionally doing 16x20 (like me), put some marks on the baseboard and tape the paper down with drafting tape. I also made a matt board mask for 14x14 to tape over the 16x20. It is a little cumbersome, but not that bad for the occasional print

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    164
    I use two easels too - a large Kostiner for 20x24 for prints from 11 * 14 and bigger - and a smaller Ahel for sizes up to 24x30 cm. The Kostiner is very hevay and not very well suited for the smaller prints. The Kostiner stays on the enlarger board and i put the Ahel on top of it when i do smaller prints. The Kostiner is big and heavy enough to be a stable base for the Ahel - and the four blades can be taken off.

  9. #19
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,271
    Images
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    I see, I'm pretty much alone with my no-need-for-an-easel concept. This surprises me, because I adopted the concept after visiting several master printers and observing them doing the same. To name a few: Ansel Adams (taped the paper to the wall), John Sexton (uses dusted double adhesive tape on a wooden board) and Howard Bond (using weights to hold the edges down on a wooden board). I revised the concept slightly by using a thin steel panel on top of the baseboard and magnets or magnetic strips to hold the paper in place.

    What's the big thing about an easel? What am I missing?
    Ralph:

    I bet you don't enter postcard exchanges.

    IMHO, easels really help if you frequently print in quantity, or switch frequently between paper sizes, or otherwise do all sorts of fiddly sorts of things.

    Over 40 years or so of printing (including some gaps) I've never printed without an easel of some sort.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #20
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    the villages .centralflorida,USA and Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,457
    Images
    1
    True, I don't print in quantity (six prints max), and I only print on one size of paper.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin