Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,821   Posts: 1,581,764   Online: 1064
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    97

    What easel recommended to make up to 16x20

    Hello,

    I want to get it right the first time with an easel. Is there a best easel to purchase that does 8x10, 11x14 and 16x20 that is solid, will last and is easy to use? Or is it wiser to have multiple easels?

    I have a Leica V35 enlarger and as far as I could tell Leica never made a large easel though I might not have found it in my searches.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,069
    Elsewhere on forum, you said your darkroom space and counter spaces are limited. I think, you will need to consider the practical size you'll be able to handle in your situation. To do 16x20, you'll need at least 3 trays that size and a place to wash your paper. If you do second fix stage, that's one more. If you do fiber, you'll be adding hypo-clear-agent stage and that's 5 total. Rather than trays, you can also use vertical processors but these are pretty expensive at large size. Also, from 35mm, you'll have to have a perfect negatives to go that large as well.

    As to easels, Saunders are pretty common and are very well made. I think many companies sell the exact same thing under their own brand names as well. These come up every few weeks on APUG for good prices. I just bought my 11x14 kind and I really like it.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    97
    Thank you for your reply.

    I'm thinking of the future expandability of things. The space that I have is very small but I have a good idea about how to maximize the space. I'm going to build a stair step system to handle the trays because otherwise I would only have room for 5x7's and even then it would be pretty tight. So the solution is use the upward space. I don't really need to see the prints come up, though I did enjoy it back when I did it long ago. I just know that as my skills in printing advance I will want to make 16x20's. For now I will learn with 8x10.

    Also in the somewhat near future I will have a dedicated darkroom space where I will be able to design the room exactly how I want it. I have a friend who has a giant loft space and he approached me with the idea that if I rented it he would build it out to suit me and my endeavor. The location is perfect and the loft is a completely blank space.

    Sincerely,

    Puma

  4. #4
    Colin Corneau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Brandon, MB
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,760
    Images
    337
    I'd go for the 4 blade variety...great way to custom size your prints. Spend the money upfront and get a good one.
    "Never criticize someone until you've walked a mile in their shoes. That way, you're a mile away and you've got their shoes."

    MY BLOG - www.reservedatalltimes.com
    YOU SHOULD LOOK AT THIS SITE - www.colincorneau.com
    INSTAGRAM: colincorneau

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    97
    So what's the best one? And can a 16x20 easel make smaller prints?

  6. #6
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,918
    Images
    60
    I find that my Saunders 11x14 four bladed easels work well with everything between 5x7 and 11x14, but are slightly awkward with prints smaller than 5x7. I wouldn't want to do 4x6, for instance, with a 16x20 easel.

    The large easels can be difficult to position if you are trying to do small prints from a smaller, non-centred portion of a negative.

    Even the cheaper two bladed easels can work well for the smaller sizes of paper, so I would suggest remaining open to the idea of two different sizes of easel.

    In my case, my Saunders 11x14 four bladed easels are my main easels. I have a two bladed 8x10 easel for postcard and smaller prints, and a two bladed 20x24 easel for the relatively rare 16x20 prints I do.

    EDIT: I don't really need two 11x14 easels - I just happen to have a second due to a bulk darkroom purchase, and each of the two are worn in different ways.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  7. #7
    Jeff Bannow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Royal Oak, MI
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,755
    Images
    41
    Good 11x14 4-bladed easels can be had for $30-50, and good 16x20 4-bladed easels can be had for $200+. I would buy the 11x14 bladed easel for now, and buy a bigger one later. You'll want to use the smaller easel most of the time anyway.

    Alternately, you can get a cheap 16x20 2 bladed easel for the few times you print that big, and an 11x14 4-bladed easel for the rest of the time.
    - Jeff (& sometimes Eva, too) - http://www.jeffbannow.com

  8. #8
    DWThomas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    SE Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,269
    Images
    67
    I have had an 11x14 two-blade for years, recently picked up a 4-blade 11x14. But even more recently I ended up picking up a cheap ($15) 8x10 two-blade off ePrey because doing 5x5 test prints in a large easel is a PITA.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    97
    Advice heeded. I'm going to get a four blade 11x14 Saunders, they seem to be very popular.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    186
    I purchased a Saunders four-bladed easel hears ago that still works great. This plus a Saunders 16x20 two-bladed easel is an economical combination that will satisfy my needs for all sizes up to 16x20.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin