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  1. #21
    jeroldharter's Avatar
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    Just a note that 0 degrees in Scotland is not the same as 0 degrees in the Sierras.

    My darkroom is above a garage that is unheated. In the winter, when it can be -20F, my water lines can freeze. Fortunately the lines are PEX and don'r rupture. Now I use a small oil heater in the garage and it keeps it remarkably warm. I suggest using one or more of the oil heaters (I think that is what Aggie mentions) because they are silent, effective, and give off no dust or air current.

    http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...7209&R=1017209
    Jerold Harter MD

  2. #22
    jeroldharter's Avatar
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    For cold feet you might check this out. I use it in the garage to keeps boots/shoes warm. My wife has one under her desk at the office.

    http://cozywinters.com/shop/tfw.html
    Jerold Harter MD

  3. #23
    jeroldharter's Avatar
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    For the garage floor you might try this radiant heating product if you are handy, have time and money, and want a tile floor. We had stuff like this in our former bathroom and it worked very well over a slate floor. I am not sure how energy efficient it is for a large space. Might be usable for parts of the floor also.

    http://www.tileheater.net/
    Jerold Harter MD

  4. #24
    fotch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeroldharter View Post
    JNow I use a small oil heater in the garage and it keeps it remarkably warm. I suggest using one or more of the oil heaters (I think that is what Aggie mentions) because they are silent, effective, and give off no dust or air current.

    http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...7209&R=1017209

    Yikes! Thats not a oil heater, its an electric room heater that heats oil in a radiator. Expensive to operate. While lower in initial cost than a fuel burning heater, will cost more. Add proper insulation in any case.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  5. #25

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    When I was just getting started with my commercial photography I built a darkroom within my 2 car garage. Completely free-standing except one wall, common to garage. I installed a small window-type air-conditioner in a custom-cut hole in the wall, which vented out into the garage, and of course outside if I opened the garage door. I also had a simple electric space heater, thermostatically controlled. The soft red glow of the elements didn't fog paper, and I turned it off when I loaded film briefly.
    I did find, in the winter when I was heating, that I also needed to run the air-conditioner on low to dehumidify the air at times.

  6. #26
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    Insulation is the least expensive product you can install in a new (or old) building. In the last year, we've started putting more roof systems on the "new" ICF construction buildings (insulated concrete foam) for custom homes. While it costs a bit more for the walls, an R40 rating is hard to beat for heating and cooling, in terms of energy costs. Having 6" solid contrete walls is sort of nice as well. Anyone building a small shop or darkroom might want to do a web search for "ICF construction" to see how things are done. Just make sure to build the roof deep enough to take lots of insulation.

    Just checked the temperature here this morning and it is 24f (pretty cold for Tucson). Turned on the heat in the darkroom just now for today's film and it is 57f inside. Since I don't use the darkroom every day, the small ceramic heater (small cube type with an internal fan) is inexpensive to run. In an hour it will be about 68f, but the building is only a 12' x 18' one car garage built with cinder block. There is a small solar panel on the roof, which helps during the winter. It pulls cold air off of the floor through the cabinet kick diffuser panels, and dumps it back in through the ceiling with a 6" duct fan. Crude but effective, and cheap to run. Passive solar would be better, but not for a darkroom. tim

  7. #27
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
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    The garage I'm going into was built from rough cut 2x6 (actually measures 2x6) and is insulated with fiberglass insulation. The garage door is already fixed in place and has a 2x4 insulated wall on the inside. It was set up for my wife's dream of breading cats. We moved them out there, with a massive outdoor fully caged area as well (about 16x20x8' high) because we were foster parenting babies at the time and the active breed of cat we had wouldn't have though twice about using a babies face as a launching pad. Even at -20C a small electric fan heater set at minimum keeps it well above freezing. I'll be able to cover the outdoor run with a temporary roof for a wood storage and cutting area.

    I've been searching ways of insulating the concrete floor, and think I've found a frugal option; rigid 1" foam insulation panels (the kind that overlap) which are glued (with foam safe glue) along the overlap, then "Tuck" taped along all the seams. Over this would go tounge and groove plywood. People describing this method say there's no need for a vapour barrier between the concrete and the foam panels as the foam itself is the vapour barrier.

    In a world in which I had disposable income raining from my wallet, I would build both a house and a darkroom with the insulated concrete foam blocks, but...

    Murray

    Added later - Thanks for the links Jerold!
    Last edited by MurrayMinchin; 01-14-2007 at 09:39 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    _________________________________________
    Note to self: Turn your negatives into positives.

  8. #28

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    My darkroom (and part of the rest of my house) is heated by my wood boiler. For those who dont know, a wood boiler is an outside furnace that heats and circulates water, in my case through iron radiators but other options are possible. It wouldnt be practical to use one for just a 12x24 building though, unless you want to heat it all day. One bonus is that my domestic hot water is also heated by a heat exchanger hooked up to the boiler, so thats nice. I have 2 50 gal tanks in line and I never run out of hot water. In fact the more I use the hotter it gets. Anyway, this probably doesnt help you but you asked.

    Wayne

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