Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,693   Posts: 1,548,958   Online: 778
      
Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 51
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    New York City & Pontremoli, Italy
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    545

    Viewing Light - Need Suggestions

    What type of light source do you use for viewing prints in the darkroom - both B&W and Color? Tungsten, Daylight?

  2. #2
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Misissauaga Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,939
    Images
    29
    I have an 80's era flourescent light boabout 12x12" balanced to 5000k mounted on the wall that lights up my dry desk. When I am viewing negs or transparencies I lift it off it's hanging bracket and set it horizontally on the desk. I have no idea where I will find replacement tubes when these burn out. There are LED type units, by the one I have I got for $25 at a phot swap meet, and so far the LED equals are $$.
    my real name, imagine that.

  3. #3
    jp80874's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Bath, OH 44210 USA
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    3,436
    Images
    6
    I think the question is larger than what light in the darkroom. Where will the final pictures be shown? Is it a gallery, a class room critique, your own walls, a client, a show? A print may look well in some light and poorly in another. Decide if you can where the print will go, analyze that light and try to replicate it in or near your darkroom to use for your printing decisions.

    John Powers

  4. #4
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,466
    Images
    60
    There are now CFLs which purport to be daylight balanced - I saw some yesterday in my local Safeway grocery store!

    It would be best to use them outside the darkroom, as they may emit light after being shut off.

    Here is an example - as you'll see, at $25.00 for a pair, they aren't cheap:

    http://www.amazon.com/Compact-Fluore.../dp/B001A0GFCG
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #5
    Maris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Noosa, Queensland, Australia.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    730
    Darkroom viewing of wet photographs is always with a low intensity tungsten lamp. A bright viewing light biasses me to make the pictures too dark which, combined with the inevitable dry-down, means the job has to be done again - delay, expense, frustration.
    Photography, the word itself, invented and defined by its author Sir John.F.W.Herschel, 14 March 1839 at the Royal Society, Somerset House, London. Quote "...Photography or the application of the Chemical rays of light to the purpose of pictorial representation,..". unquote.

  6. #6
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Central florida,USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,572
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Maris View Post
    Darkroom viewing of wet photographs is always with a low intensity tungsten lamp. A bright viewing light biasses me to make the pictures too dark which, combined with the inevitable dry-down, means the job has to be done again - delay, expense, frustration.
    Amen to that! Obviously a voice of experience!

    A dedicated location for dry or wet print evaluation is an important feature of a well-designed darkroom. The area should be evenly illuminated and closely simulate final viewing conditions. Prints produced and evaluated in brightly lit darkrooms end up looking too dark in dimmer environments. A 60-100W opal tungsten bulb, a distance of 1-2 meters from the evaluation board, provides an illumination of around EV 6 at ISO 100/21°. This setup simulates rather dim display-lighting conditions and is ideal for dry print evaluation.

    Why use a daylight bulb for print evaluation when the prints are exhibited indoors?
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  7. #7
    greybeard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Northern California
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    377
    Images
    6
    If you are concerned with evaluating test strips, then a hair dryer or the equivalent (to invoke the dry-down effect) and something like normal room light is fine; if you are talking about "finished" prints, then a full-size print needs to be seen against whatever background it will be displayed with, usually a mounting board or mat. In the latter case, you are basically talking about making a finished print with the understanding that it is for evaluation, not necessarily preservation. This is particularly true of very high- or low-key images, where the contrast between the print and surround is quite important, and the qualities of the light may affect the mount and image differently.

  8. #8
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,466
    Images
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    .

    Why use a daylight bulb for print evaluation when the prints are exhibited indoors?
    Ralph:

    The OP asked about both black and white and colour printing.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,066
    You can find other posts on this topic in this forum. To Maris' and Ralph's point, but with different quantification - I use a 40W bulb (incandescent, the same bulb for 20+ years, don't know what it will be when I switch to CF) about a meter from the print viewing surface, which is a piece of plexiglass angled so that when I stand 1 -2 meters away, I am viewing at about 90 degrees angle to the surface. This works well for me, compensates for drydown, etc. I frequently don't know the exhibition conditions, so I don't worry about that.

  10. #10
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Central florida,USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,572
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Ralph:

    The OP asked about both black and white and colour printing.
    Matt

    My question applies to both. Why a different light temperature for print validation and exhibition? I don't understand the need for a daylight bulb since daylight is not a typical exhibition lighting.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin