Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,875   Posts: 1,520,200   Online: 1229
      
Page 2 of 11 FirstFirst 12345678 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 109
  1. #11
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,124
    The inflation calculator says the new Jobo I bought in 2000 cost $1500 in todays dollars with no drums or reels. It seems to me almost all the units I have seen on ebay go for less than that. I'd just look for another Jobo. If I were going to put together R&D resources, I'd work on making spare Jobo parts.

  2. #12
    hoffy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Adelaide, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,819
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    57
    I agree with ic

    I just went through the process of resurrecting a Jobo CPE-2. Considering my electronics knowledge boarders on "Just enough to get me in trouble, hardly enough to fix anything", I would have to say that I would try and fix an keep a jobo going, even if it means gutting out all the electrics/mechanicals and starting with an empty bath.

    In the end, building a circuit that will turn and reverse the motor is not that difficult (& you can get kits that would suit off the shelf), the motor is nothing more then a 24v (running at 18v) motor and reduction gearbox (you build the circuit right and you could have it infinitely variable below the max RPM).

    Yes, the heating circuit would be harder, but certainly no harder then trying to build a new unit from scratch.

    Maybe I am looking at it too simplistic (the issue on mine was a simple fried power supply).

  3. #13
    tonyjuliano's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Glenside, Pennsylvania - USA
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    The inflation calculator says the new Jobo I bought in 2000 cost $1500 in todays dollars with no drums or reels. It seems to me almost all the units I have seen on ebay go for less than that. I'd just look for another Jobo. If I were going to put together R&D resources, I'd work on making spare Jobo parts.
    In 1985 a CPE2 cost $450.00, in 1995 a CPE2 Plus cost $600.00.

    In today's dollars that works out to be $885.00 & $836.00 respectively. and that is for brand spankin' new.

    If the units on eBay were brand new, I could see your point, but they are far from it. Most of them are in horrid condition, and have seen a lot of use. Still, try to get one for much less than $600.

    Too difficult to make spares for the original JOBO's. Most of the failures are motors (and there is absolutely no substitute, or injection molded plastic, which would be cost prohibitive to produce in small quantities.

    My design criteria will eliminate most of the problems associated with the JOBO flaws, and will have a much longer service life, with easily replaceable parts.
    "The photo is a thing in itself. And that's what still photography is all about." - Garry Winogrand

    My Photography Blog
    My Flickr Photostream
    My Website
    My Street Photography

  4. #14
    Diapositivo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rome, Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,844
    Tony, I suggest trying to design a machine that can be sold and shipped without the water basin. This would make the machine much smaller and lighter to ship anywhere in the world. When buying a Jobo, weight and shipping costs are an obstacle.

    Most anybody can find some kind of big water basin, plastic or metallic according to taste. The ideal solution would be something that you put inside this large basin. It will rotate the tank, warm the water, circulate it and maybe provide some kind of rapid change like the "lift".

    If you go for this solution (i.e. only selling the complicated parts, not the basin) I suggest considering two separate units: the "baths" unit and the "tank" unit. The first unit, the "baths" unit, serves to keep chemicals and water at the right temperature. You provide thermostat, heater, pump and the user provides the basin.

    The second unit has the motor for the tank rotation, and also keeps the tank at constant temperature. That means two heaters and two pumps, but the cost overall (for not having to buy a specific basin, and for saving on shipping) will probably be less. Much greater flexibility would be achieved.

    Separating the two units has several advantages:

    - No need to design a two-level basin (like the Jobo); users can use common plastic basins;
    - Much less problems in regulating the water level around the tank;
    - Anybody can adopt it better to the space he has in his darkroom. One could even keep the chemistry behind his back if need be;
    - People who need 7 or more baths (including rinsing water) will have a big basin for their "baths" unit. I use 7 chemical baths plus 6 litres of warm water in my E6 processing. People who only need 3 or 4 baths will use a smaller basin and will save space.
    - The same gear can be used when people shifts from B&W only to C41, and then from C41 to E6.
    - By the same token, if you use a powerful enough motor (don't save on that), people can use it in a little basin if they only use a 1-roll tank or 2-roll tank, and save space. When they decide that they want to try with 6-roll tanks, they will just move the unit in a larger basin.

    I also suggest the heating to be made with a digital and precise thermostat, like the Jobo CPP2.

    Personally I prefer plastic. It takes more time to go in temperature but, once there, it is easier to keep it at a stable temperature.

    Fabrizio
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  5. #15
    Steve Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ryde, Isle of Wight
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    8,546
    Images
    122
    I'm too far away from you to be of much help but I will keep looking to see how you are getting on. I regularly cut PVC sheet using our CNC drill/router which was intended for PCB manufacture (see my 6x12 camera link). Something like this would be easy to make parts for on the CNC machine we have.


    Steve.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Chicago, Western Suburbs
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,433

    Maybe these will help.

    Hello,

    This was done for less than $200. It does, however, use Jobo tanks and their magnets for driving. It does not have a lift. I built it so that I would not have to worry about replacing specialized parts. It uses a synchronous motor that runs at around 75rpm and uses cheap timer relays for reversing. I have a little .avi clip but I couldn't upload it.

    Good luck,

    Neal Wydra
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails OverallView.JPG   InsideControlBox.JPG   InsideSump.JPG   TemperingBath1.JPG   SS150 Wiring Diagram.jpg  

    WaterHeater.JPG   TemperingBath2.JPG  

  7. #17
    yeknom02's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    State College, PA, United States
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    308
    Images
    5
    Tony,

    Please keep me updated, because I've wanted to look into home E-6 for a while but without the soon-to-be-defunct Jobo equipment. And let me know if there's any way I can assist you. I work primarily in vibration and acoustics, but they did give me an M.S. in mechanical engineering. (Suckers...)

    -Dan
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST
    My Flickr Gallery

  8. #18
    tonyjuliano's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Glenside, Pennsylvania - USA
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by Neal View Post
    Hello,

    This was done for less than $200. It does, however, use Jobo tanks and their magnets for driving. It does not have a lift. I built it so that I would not have to worry about replacing specialized parts. It uses a synchronous motor that runs at around 75rpm and uses cheap timer relays for reversing. I have a little .avi clip but I couldn't upload it.

    Good luck,

    Neal Wydra
    Neal, thanks for sharing. I may be "picking your brain" about this sometime in the near future (if you don't mind...).
    "The photo is a thing in itself. And that's what still photography is all about." - Garry Winogrand

    My Photography Blog
    My Flickr Photostream
    My Website
    My Street Photography

  9. #19
    tonyjuliano's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Glenside, Pennsylvania - USA
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by yeknom02 View Post
    Tony,

    Please keep me updated, because I've wanted to look into home E-6 for a while but without the soon-to-be-defunct Jobo equipment. And let me know if there's any way I can assist you. I work primarily in vibration and acoustics, but they did give me an M.S. in mechanical engineering. (Suckers...)

    -Dan
    Updates will be forthcoming...

    If you are interested in getting involved, leave a comment on my site. this is where I'm trying to keep everything together.
    "The photo is a thing in itself. And that's what still photography is all about." - Garry Winogrand

    My Photography Blog
    My Flickr Photostream
    My Website
    My Street Photography

  10. #20
    michaelbsc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    South Carolina
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,092
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by tonyjuliano View Post
    Updates will be forthcoming...

    If you are interested in getting involved, leave a comment on my site. this is where I'm trying to keep everything together.
    There are some pretty inexpensive Chinese made temperature controller in evilBay. I just bought one, and it looks good so far, but I haven't given it a thorough workout yet. My gut feeling, however, is that it's going to be able to provide dead on accurate temperature control. Most items like this seem to be rock solid, and the technology is old enough that it's not hard to get right.

    If you aren't comfortable with the electronics PM me and I'll try to work out some details for you, so long as you promise to return the design for my part to the community. Kind of a Hardware Open Source design. I'll put this on your site, too.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

Page 2 of 11 FirstFirst 12345678 ... LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin