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  1. #1
    GRHazelton's Avatar
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    Paterson vs stainless steel reels??

    I'm moving into MF with my recently acquired Pentax 645N. Now comes processing the BW film!

    I've used Omega/Kinderman whatever stainless steel tanks and reels for 35mm in the past, and in a burst of enthusiasm I bought a 120 reel for the tank.

    Having read some cautionary tales about loading 120 on stainless steel reels, I wonder if I should use my ancient Paterson? The stainless would save some chemicals, but the Paterson would maintain temperature better.

    And then there is fumbling with film in the dark....

    Any opinions or advice out there?

  2. #2
    ann
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    I have found that 120 is easier with ss, reels, and in fact most of my students do as well. I am not sure if it is because i use them or they have discovered that for themselves.

    just find a test roll and practice and all should be fine.
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

  3. #3
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    If your Patterson reel work for you, great.

    I have had some problems years ago with plastic reels.

    Since I started using Hewes steel reels, I have had no problems.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  4. #4
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    I've used both extensively, and professionally so heavy usage.

    Never had an issue with Paterson reels and that's all I use these days, but you do need to keep them clean. Some of my Paterson reels are probably about 40 years old and still load easily. (I have far earlier as well).

    Ian

  5. #5
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    The trick to using 120 with SS reels is to be very, very sure the film is centered on that little clip in the center before winding the film on. If the film is off center at the middle it will kink and dimple as you try to wind the film.
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  6. #6
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    I really like stainless steel reels, ever since I bought Hewes ones. Earlier I used no-name hand-me-downs, and they were not straight, and it was a pain in the a$$ to use them.
    Hewes 35mm reels are self centering, and it's very very difficult to NOT get the 120 film straight into the reel as well. A dream come true for me, and I did have some problems with the Paterson reels. That could have been down to my technique rather than the reels themselves, though, and Paterson has worked very well for others, so don't disregard them.

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

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  7. #7

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    It's obvious why the Hewes 35mm stainless reels work so well. I can't for the life of me see the reason their 120 stainless reels work so much better than everyone else's... but they do! A big vote from me for the stainless route, but only with the Hewes reels.


    Duncan

  8. #8

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    I never use SS reals, but I have used Patterson and so far been pretty decent as for 120 film.

    Jeff

  9. #9

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    I have always used Hewes stainless reels, they have never let me down. The first time I used the 120 reel, I had my hands in the changing bag for a LONG time before I had a bit of an epiphany, and I've never had a problem since.

    Lay the film flat on top of the little bars (circled below),


    so that it looks like this


    press the clip to open it and just slide the film in a little and release the clip


    and then the film will wind right on.


    This is incredibly easy to do by feel in the dark. Practice with a spoiled roll in the light can't hurt.

    Hope this helps just one person that has been cussing out stainless 120 reels in the past.

  10. #10

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    I tried to load 120 into a paterson once, after about a half hour I ended up tossing my unspooled film into the tank and capping it so that I could open the dark bag and toss in my SS tank and spool, 3 minuets later I was headed for the sink to start the processing.
    "Would you like it if someone that painted in oils told you that you were not making portraits because you were using a camera?"
    "Shouldn't it be more about the joy of producing and viewing the photo than what you paid for the camera?"

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