Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,657   Posts: 1,481,415   Online: 1070
      
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 29 of 29
  1. #21
    artonpaper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    325
    Images
    135
    One thing to pay attention to when loading ss reels is that the film is well centered when you are attaching the film to reel. I have found that if it is loaded off center, that is, pushed too much toward one side of the reel or the other, that's when you get difficulties that lead to film touching film. Also, BEWARE OF BENT REELS. They can really wreck havoc.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    May 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    476
    I only have one small bit of advice. If you are going SS reels spend a little extra cash. I used Paterson reels, FR tanks and reels, Agfa-loadall 120 & 35mm tanks and in college SS. I never liked SS reels for loading. I even tried the special loading tools you feed the leader through and still had a bitch of a time loading them. I'd always have some of those half-moon crease or film touching spots. I like the idea of easy cleanup and almost instant heat transfer, but that was it. Then I kept reading about these Hewes SS reels and how they worked so much better than anything else. Well, I had always used Nikkor reels and thought they had to be the best so what's the big difference. A while back, when darkroom gear was almost given away on eBay, I came across some Hewes reels in 35mm and 120. I got lucky a won them and now I'm a very happy camper. I know all those SS reels look the same, but I can tell you they are not all created equal. I will use nothing but Hewes reels ever again. Yes, I know it's hard to believe there can be that much difference, but there really is. If it wasn't for Hewe's I'd be using Paterson plastics. Oh, and I sold my CPP2 w/ lift 'cause I didn't do color anymore and the B&W I do is just fine by hand. Hewes reels are the answer! JohnW

    I should add that the Hewes reel are the answer for me. You might be different in your view of them since they are much more expensive, but sometimes one gets what one pays for.
    Last edited by John Wiegerink; 04-08-2011 at 09:04 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    189
    When I started (over 48 years ago) I used Yankee plastic tanks, they were great. However as I progressed, I found that when I wanted to develop more than one roll, I had to wait under the tank dried or the film stuck, or whatever and caused developmental problems with the film. I tried stainless (Nikor tanks, very expensive at the time as I recall) there was a steeper learning curve but once that was mastered it seemed easier. PLUS, now I could develop as many rolls as I wanted without all the waiting. Soon I even progressed to a quart tank, limits it seemed were gone.

    Go ahead, try stainless, you will like it. Do use a expendable roll to practice loading and it will be easier.

    Oh, don't drop the reels, plastic shatters and stainless bends, not good for either.

    Paul

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    New York City
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    29

    Stainless steel reals in a changing bag

    As someone who develops film at home using a changing bag (and who rents darkroom time for printing), I was wondering if it is possible to use stainless steel reels in the confines of a changing bag. I too have had troubles with loading 120 onto Patterson reels, and had much better luck with the Samigon reels as they have a built in "loading platform" that helps align the film...but occasionally they still seem to stick and crease the film.

    Has anyone tried to load stainless steel reels in a changing bag?
    Thanks
    Michael

  5. #25

    Join Date
    May 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    476
    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelR View Post
    As someone who develops film at home using a changing bag (and who rents darkroom time for printing), I was wondering if it is possible to use stainless steel reels in the confines of a changing bag. I too have had troubles with loading 120 onto Patterson reels, and had much better luck with the Samigon reels as they have a built in "loading platform" that helps align the film...but occasionally they still seem to stick and crease the film.

    Has anyone tried to load stainless steel reels in a changing bag?
    Thanks
    Michael
    I have loaded 120 onto SS reels in a large(not small) changing bag, but it's not as easy as working in a light-tight room. I found that if I do it in a changing bag that it is almost a must to completely remove the film from the paper backing first and then let the film re-curl into a cylinder form. Just works better for me. Your mileage might vary. JohnW

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    New York City
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    29
    Thanks, I think I'll give it a try.

  7. #27
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    11,563
    Images
    59
    The problem with changing bags is that they encourage the build up of humidity. Humid air leads to slippery hands and sticky film.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Montreal
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    41
    Michael,

    John's tip about removing the paper backing is solid.
    If you have a large changing bag, make a small wire frame from coat hanger wire to insert in the changing bag to give it a "ceiling".

    As a former wire service shooter in the days of film, I roll many a roll in a changing bag, while I sure prefer the darkroom, a changing bag works.




    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelR View Post
    As someone who develops film at home using a changing bag (and who rents darkroom time for printing), I was wondering if it is possible to use stainless steel reels in the confines of a changing bag. I too have had troubles with loading 120 onto Patterson reels, and had much better luck with the Samigon reels as they have a built in "loading platform" that helps align the film...but occasionally they still seem to stick and crease the film.

    Has anyone tried to load stainless steel reels in a changing bag?
    Thanks
    Michael

  9. #29

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lake, Michigan
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    318
    Quote Originally Posted by Allen in Montreal View Post
    Michael,

    John's tip about removing the paper backing is solid.
    If you have a large changing bag, make a small wire frame from coat hanger wire to insert in the changing bag to give it a "ceiling".

    As a former wire service shooter in the days of film, I roll many a roll in a changing bag, while I sure prefer the darkroom, a changing bag works.
    I think a tip just as important as the backing paper is the size of the changing bag. I have done it in a small bag before, but it sure makes a hard job even harder. Yes ladies, bigger is better when it comes to the size of your bag. JohnW

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin