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  1. #1
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Kodaloid printing mask

    I came across a few of these in my collection of stuff.
    They are Kodaloid printing masks:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Can anybody tell me what they are used for?

    They are made of cellulose nitrate. I checked them. They are slightly shrunken but are otherwise good. No degradation. I'm not hip about keeping them. If they aren't valuable or readily useful for anything I'd just as soon get rid of them.

    I'm a projectionist. I know how to handle nitrate. It doesn't bother me. Let's just frame the question this way: Would you store a Mason jar full of gasoline in your darkroom?
    Last edited by Worker 11811; 04-08-2011 at 02:27 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  2. #2

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    Looks like they are for masking borders in contact frames;

    http://tinyurl.com/5w84sg5 (scroll up in this one for the frames)
    http://tinyurl.com/3zhu32p

    Yeah, I wouldn't want to store a jar of gasoline in my darkroom either.

    The package is probably more valuable than the contents, maybe $5.00 or so in an antique shop, as a guess.

  3. #3
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    So you sandwich these between the negative and the photo paper. Right?
    And, because they are deep red, the paper isn't exposed around the edges.

    Yes, I found them in a box along with some contact frames.
    It all makes sense, now.

    Thanks!

    BTW: Just a fun fact. It is illegal in Pennsylvania, where I live, to even set foot in a theater projection room with a reel of nitrate film in your possession unless the projectors are all outfitted with certain safety devices to prevent the spread of fire and other fire safety systems to protect the patrons in case of fire. There are laws to the same effect in most states, as well.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  4. #4
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    use 'em, just make sure you have a cold light! doh!
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  5. #5
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    I have only discovered a few pieces, so far. When I get to the bottom of this box, I bet there will only be about 5 or 6 pieces of the stuff 4x6 inches in size.

    Not enough to cause an international incident but, as with all things, due caution is advised. They've been around for 50 years without incident and they show only the most minimal deterioration, if any at all. If stored safely, there should be no problem.

    I have a metal box to store them in and I will keep it segregated from everything else until I decide what to do.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  6. #6
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Can you post a picture of the masks for posterity before you safely dispose of them? Could be fun. Sort of.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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