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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by George Nova Scotia View Post
    You just might be correct...

    If so,
    Can I convert this somehow to RS232 Dsub25 ?

    What can I do with this?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Macbeth Cable 002.jpg  
    Last edited by Ray Rogers; 04-20-2011 at 10:18 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #22
    Neanderman's Avatar
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    Ah, yes. The good old GPIB interface. As a parallel bus, it's not directly convertible to serial. Check out National Instruments, they probably have the largest support for GPIB, including (at one time, at least) a free library for developing code to support it. The downside is, this stuff is EXPENSIVE if you buy it new. A better bet is to look for a used card out on one of the Internet dumping grounds for stuff (i.e., 'the bay'). If you have a card, NI is pretty good with support.

    Ed
    "I only wanted Uncle Vern standing by his new car (a Hudson) on a clear day. I got him and the car. I also got a bit of Aunt Mary's laundry, and Beau Jack, the dog, peeing on a fence, and a row of potted tuberous begonias on the porch and 78 trees and a million pebbles in the driveway and more. It's a generous medium, photography." -- Lee Friedlander

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Neanderman View Post
    Ah, yes. The good old GPIB interface. As a parallel bus, it's not directly convertible to serial...A better bet is to look for a used card out on one of the Internet dumping grounds for stuff (i.e., 'the bay'). If you have a card, NI is pretty good with support.
    Ed
    ?

    Card... What's this? Can you explain your suggested approach in more detail?

  4. #24
    Neanderman's Avatar
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    Sure, it's an add-in card for a computer. They are available for the 'old' ISA or the newer PCI or PCI-E busses. You then use software on the computer to read and interpret the data from the device (in this case, a densitometer).

    I'm not sure exactly what you are trying to do via the cable.
    "I only wanted Uncle Vern standing by his new car (a Hudson) on a clear day. I got him and the car. I also got a bit of Aunt Mary's laundry, and Beau Jack, the dog, peeing on a fence, and a row of potted tuberous begonias on the porch and 78 trees and a million pebbles in the driveway and more. It's a generous medium, photography." -- Lee Friedlander

  5. #25

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    I want to connect a densitometer
    (wh. has the cable in question built into it-male connector)
    to a laptop (which has an RS232 type (female) connector.

    Software then feeds the measured data into excell.
    Last edited by Ray Rogers; 04-21-2011 at 05:34 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #26
    Neanderman's Avatar
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    Well, it comes down to being more than just a pin to pin conversion. The IEEE-488 is a parallel datastream whereas RS-232 is serial.

    For a laptop connection, your best bet may well be something like this: http://www.l-com.com/item.aspx?id=9136.

    Unfortunately, I don't think you're going to find an inexpensive solution.

    Ed
    "I only wanted Uncle Vern standing by his new car (a Hudson) on a clear day. I got him and the car. I also got a bit of Aunt Mary's laundry, and Beau Jack, the dog, peeing on a fence, and a row of potted tuberous begonias on the porch and 78 trees and a million pebbles in the driveway and more. It's a generous medium, photography." -- Lee Friedlander

  7. #27
    Neanderman's Avatar
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    National Instruments has a direct IEEE-488 to RS-232 converter, but it's even more expensive: http://sine.ni.com/nips/cds/view/p/lang/en/nid/203552

    Ed
    "I only wanted Uncle Vern standing by his new car (a Hudson) on a clear day. I got him and the car. I also got a bit of Aunt Mary's laundry, and Beau Jack, the dog, peeing on a fence, and a row of potted tuberous begonias on the porch and 78 trees and a million pebbles in the driveway and more. It's a generous medium, photography." -- Lee Friedlander

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Rogers View Post
    Well- I sought confirmation from several angles and it seems things are straightened out.
    I used Mr. Bill's data to cross check results ...

    My lowest values were obtained when the complementary color to that indicated by Mr Bill, was set.
    According to the comments about RGB and CMY being sort of interchangable, perhaps this is a non-issue.
    I just came across an old Macbeth user's manual for a reflection unit - they note that the colored dots on the turret are the same color as the sample to be read, "for convenience." Also, they confirm that the actual filter is the complement - that is, the cyan-dot turret position is used for a cyan test-patch, but it uses a red filter, etc. This is essentially what I said in a previous post.

    One might wonder why "for convenience," well, at one time it was common for process control strips (paper process) to have separate cyan, magenta, and yellow test patches. So the color code helps the neophyte take the readings properly. Still, when it's time to plot results on a chart, it's traditional to translate back to red, green, and blue (see Kodak's Z-manuals, for process control, for confirmation of this).

    So, just to confirm, even though Macbeth unit has cyan, magenta, and yellow on the turret, it is still taking the readings commonly referred to as red, green, and blue. And it should be acceptable to say it either way, ie, "I just measured the cyan dye density" is the same thing as "I just took a red-filter reading." But if you're talking about process control charts, it's always about the "red plot" (or green, or blue) never cyan.

    By the way, I took a close look at your readings. I had thought you could need to use the Macbeth card as your calibration tool - had you done so, then the white patch would necessarily read whatever you made it "calibrate" to. Since your yellow reading (ie, blue-filter) is so high, I presume that you calibrated the machine in another manner, then took readings of the card. IF this is correct, AND IF your white patch truly is yellowish, then everything seems to be normal.

    Also, I re-read my chart with another instrument, which can translate into density values for the different status systems. Status E and T both have recognizeable color signatures, which your machine does not show. Therefore, I'm pretty confident that yours is a status A, which is what you want for reading color prints.
    My Light is quite yellowish... is this normal?
    Are they generally useable till they die?
    Or, are they supposed to be used for some % of their entire life?
    In my experience, they have a very long life (much longer than a transmission densitometer), then will just go dead. But I don't think there should be a yellowish appearance. You might want to have a look inside, if you're handy with these things.


    So hopefully you have a good working machine to play with. I'm off for a long weekend, but will check back here Mon or Tues to see if anything new.

  9. #29

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    Neanderman,

    Actually, I like the USB option...
    The device pictured has male not the female connector...
    since the cable I have has both (for daisy training) -

    Would this possibly work just by connecting the back side (female)
    to the converter mentioned above?

    Well that is one hella va cable!... I am SURE someone will throw one away
    (or out to ebay) without knowing what it is....

    But till then - lets look for another option!

    Since the cable is attached to the densitometer...
    it must have been intended for a computer that took that cable...
    Old computers, if you can find them, might be pretty cheap these days.

    What computers had these on them as standard features?
    Were they pretty common?
    What are my chances of finding a functioning computer
    with excel and a usb or at least a FDD?

    In anycase, thanks for enlightening me about these gems!
    Last edited by Ray Rogers; 04-22-2011 at 01:14 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #30
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    Well, that's part of the problem. These weren't common as standard features. Wikipedia says a "few" early Commodore computers used them for things like floppy drives, but they didn't use the Centronics-type connector like your densitometer has.

    By far the biggest user of GPIB was HP, who really invented it. It was the common interface used on its scientific instruments, so, naturally, it sold (again...) "a few" models of computers with ports.

    And, of course, with older computers, you're stuck with older software, which can be harder to find than the hardware.

    I would add, too, that diving into something like this is not for the faint of heart. You're getting pretty close to hardcore geekdom here. Odds are that you're not going to find something that is 'plug and play' -- you might even have to write some computer code. And only you know if you're up to that.

    Ed
    "I only wanted Uncle Vern standing by his new car (a Hudson) on a clear day. I got him and the car. I also got a bit of Aunt Mary's laundry, and Beau Jack, the dog, peeing on a fence, and a row of potted tuberous begonias on the porch and 78 trees and a million pebbles in the driveway and more. It's a generous medium, photography." -- Lee Friedlander

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