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  1. #31

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    To update this thread:

    1.
    Thanks to everyone for your input.

    2.
    I hope Mr. Bill had a nice long weekend!

    3.
    The Setting/Orientation issue is nearly completely resolved. What remains is the fabrication of a substitute disk, and its permenant attachment to the reading head/arm. Temporaralily I have fashioned one out of black art cardboard... a colorless, clear, tight fitting piece of acryll wedged into the "hat" might even suffice to make my cardboard fix longlasting....

    4.
    My current Speculative Thinking on the cable problem:
    a. The Units came with RS232 compatibility.
    b. The Units were sold with RS232 cables, for those who paid for that option.
    c. The Units were sold with RC40-24PR cables, for those who paid for that option.
    d. The Units referred to in (c) either
    had the RS232 interface REPLACED with one for the GPIB/IE488/RC40-24PR cable
    or
    had an ADDITIONAL INTERFACE INSTALLED.

    e. Looking inside of the unit, one with more knowlegde than myself, might be able to respond to (d)
    and even suggest the next step needed to restore RS232 compatibility.

    f.
    I was told by the software developer that Macbeth sold the cables needed
    and that they were not expensive!

    g.
    I called the current, local X-Rite rep and after a 60 second delay he called me back to say my densitometer is no longer supported and that "Macbeth" no longer exists. Several clues lead me to suspect that he did not have any hard info & that he had no desire to try and help out either.

    I do think that here, as in other countries, there were more than one agent, repair station or what have you, so I will try to contact others that might have sold or serviced these units.

    (The author of the software said he would look around for a solution as well.)

    So, that is where the issue stands as of now.
    If any of my assumptions in 4 (a-e) are faulty, please correct me/them.

    Thanks,

    Ray

  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Neanderman View Post
    National Instruments has a direct IEEE-488 to RS-232 converter, but it's even more expensive: http://sine.ni.com/nips/cds/view/p/lang/en/nid/203552

    Ed
    Nothing at National Instruments is cheap! I've bought their old GPIB/HPIB cards and they are expensive!
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

  3. #33

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    Ray - before you spend a lot of time and your hard pressed cash into getting a cable/interface for your computer, make sure that your densitometer will calibrate and that it makes linear readings. No point in going through all that to find you have to spend more money on repairing a poorly functioning densitometer.

    (Now if only I would follow my own advice on these sort of things...)
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

  4. #34

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    Also, check the X-rite web site as they offer colibration standards for transmission and refective densitometers. For transmission, I think older Macbeths used a "B&W" film that had a density of about 3.0 and the slope of each channel was adjusted to get that reading and then it was "calibrated".

    Look around for a Noritsu DM-201 - they can read visual, red, green, and blue simultaneously and display all 4 readings at the same time. It's a huge time saver compared to having to calibrate the different channels one after the other. SO much faster with the Noritsu than my Macbeth TD-901.

    Also check Stouffer's web site as they make some things that can work as well, and often cheaper than X-rite.

    Anyone want to buy an old Macbeth densitometer for real cheap?
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk Keyes View Post
    Ray - before you spend a lot of time and your hard pressed cash into getting a cable/interface for your computer, make sure that your densitometer will calibrate and that it makes linear readings....
    Hi Kirk.

    What do you mean by "make linear readings" & "calibrate" in this sentence?
    How do you "make" sure?

    I think I am fine, but your question suggests to me you might have a procedure or test in mind that I have not done.

    FWIW, I do have the standard calibration reference that came with this model... and the adjustment knobs (zero & calibrate) appear to be functioning normally.

    I will look for the Noritsu DM-201.
    BTW, do you have a true "operator's manual" for yours?

    In order to open mine up properly...
    I need some insight on which screws to screw with!

    As far as wanting to buy an old Macbeth densitometer for real cheap...
    what cables does it come with?
    (Perhaps you could detach the one I want before selling!)

    Ray

  6. #36

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    Ray -

    Here's a link to the owner's manual for the Noritsu DM-201:
    http://www.keyesphoto.com/Noritsu%20...%20Manual.html

    By making sure your calibration is linear, I mean that you calibrate the instrument according to the manufacturer's instructions, and then use a standard that has several areas of known density and you measure those areas and verify that you get readings of those areas that are within an acceptable difference from the known values.

    I use a X-Rite transmission Calibration Step Wedge film with 4 areas on it. They are, with Visual readings, at 0.26, 1.50, 3.01, and 3.75 Density. I calibrate the Noristu at 0.00 D (with no film in the instrument) and then at the 3.01 "Hi Cal" area of the X-Rite film. I then read the other 3 "linearity" check areas to make sure it's a linear calibration - and that it accurate all the way across the calibratio range and not just at the 2 points I calibrated it (0.00 and 3.01).

    You can't be certain that your readings are not biased high or low in between your calibration points without checking them with a known standard. X-Rite lists an error of +/- 0.02 D as acceptable for the range from 0.00 to 3.0 D.

    The X-Rite film actually has certifited readings for not only visual readings, but red, green, and blue as well.

    The X-Rite part number is 810-68. It's listed here on their web site:
    https://www.xrite.com/product_overview.aspx?ID=1540
    It lists for $75 USD.

    By the way, you can get a reflection calibration plate from X-Rite as well. It has two calibration points on it and one linearity check point. It's enamalled steel and should last a lifetime!
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

  7. #37

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    My Macbeth did not have any cables with it.

    Did I mention the Nortisu DM-201 has a built in RS-232C port as well as a built in dot-matrix printer!?
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

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