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Thread: 16x20 question

  1. #21
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    I use one L for 8x10, two L for 11x14, and four L for 16x20. You just have to fill the tray from L graduates to find out in about a minute.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  2. #22
    winger's Avatar
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    I figured out one difference in how I have the trays that should help next week. What's causing most of my consternation is that I'm using the trays on a rack, so the developer is on top, then the stop is below and then the fixer was in the sink under the rack. I figured out a way to get the fixer tray slightly higher, which might help to get the paper into it without having to shove it so far under everything where I can't see it.
    My problem with using gloves is that I would use a new pair for each print. I'm not going to wash them and use one in the developer that had been in the fixer - it's just not in this labrat to do that. When a glove comes off, it goes in the trash. And that's why I don't use my fingers, Brian - too much chance of getting fixer on a print that hasn't gone through the developer, yet. I've only slightly creased one print and that was an early one, so I'm not that bothered by the tongs now that I've had some practice. It's just so slow. It's also boring since I'm not doing my stuff, just some old glass plates. I know they're interesting to some people, but making 6 prints of each gets pretty dull pretty quickly.

  3. #23

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    Ok,our friend is having the following problems : paper handling/damage & chemical contamination concerns.
    I'll detail my workflow,which avoids these problems.
    Place exposed paper in a dry 16x20 tray.
    Pour in the tempered developer, just enough to cover the print with a few mm of fluid.
    You can prepare any volume of developer needed for your session,but use the minimum amount for each print.
    This avoids the handling of a heavy,fluid filled tray, and allows easy transfer of the developer back into the storage container.
    The fiber based print will stick to the base of the tray as it is drained,even when held vertically.
    The stop and fix steps follow as above, and subsequent hypo-clear or toning procedures.
    If needed,the print can also be archivally washed in the same tray,using the soak and dump method.
    Note the print has not been touched or moved during the entire cycle,so handling marks or creases are eliminated. And no more than a couple of liters of fluid has been handled,so operator fatigue,spills and splashes are unlikely.
    A hose and spray head are useful to prevent cross contamination,especially between stop and fix.

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