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  1. #11

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    Thanks everyone!

    Thanks all for the ideas, especially for the surface mounted electrical. Since I intend to insulate I have open stud bays and just sort of assumed I would put electrical inside them. The surface mounting would be much more "adjustable".

    sa

  2. #12
    ROL
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    A place for the trash can (the old canard being the most important tool) that is out of the way.

    Might want to take a look a A Darkroom Portrait, for an intensive study of one darkroom.

  3. #13

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    Two things come to mind about the basement darkroom I set up from scratch.

    First, I made the mistake of building dry-side storage shelves with "kick bases" that do not allow cleaning/mopping under them. I have no floor drain to collect spilled fluids (WILL occur at some time). Since one of my minor water connections started leaking - fortunately I was home to stop it - I've made the necessary changes to that joint, but I was also fortunate in having covered the entire concrete floor with the type of thick rubber anti-fatigue mat interlinking sections that have a bunch of one-inch holes in them, so these holes held most of the leaked water. I now keep a bucket and mop handy.

    Second, I wish I had not placed all the plumbing lines inside the walls, which would mean tearing the walls apart to locate/repair any leaks.

  4. #14

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    My first couple were crammed into available, unalterable spaces. They were small, but efficient.

    The next was 8x10 feet, drop table, dry side and wet side. It was really perfect for its size.

    15x9 became available next to the entry to the 8x10. I expanded and attached that area. The enlarger was moved to the new space and I acquired more. There is space for dry mounting and framing.

    Caution. Make the walk from enlarger to developer tray as short as possible for the most frequently used enlarger.

    Build counters heavy, 2x4 legs and cross/diagonal bracing. 3/4" plywood tops with solid wood edges and beveled.

    Build all counters/sinks tall enough so you are not hunched over. Kitchen counter tops are for short women, 5 feet 2. My counters bring the enlarger bases to 38". Perfect for me. My short friends have trouble.

    Enlarger bases are usually too small. Either sink below counter height and make a cutout or add framing to extend edges.

  5. #15
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    When you get to plumbing your sink, the mistake I made in my first darkroom was to put the faucet/fixture unit in the sink. That takes a lot of space. This darkroom I installed the faucet and knobs up high on the wall outside the sink so I have more sink. I have to reach up pretty high to turn the water on and look up at the thermometer but it beats having all that and the hose connections in the way.
    Dennis

  6. #16
    rmolson's Avatar
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    When I finally built a darkroom in the basement I conserved space and only made the space between the wet and dry side 30 inches. I didn't take into consideration my getting wider over the years It is still a good darkroom but a bit snug!

  7. #17
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ROL View Post
    Might want to take a look a A Darkroom Portrait, for an intensive study of one darkroom.
    Or: http://newdr.blogspot.com/

    FWIW, I'm already making minor changes.
    David
    Taking pictures is easy. Making photographs is hard.

    http://www.behance.net/silverdarkroom
    http://silverdarkroom.wordpress.com

  8. #18

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    1: use a well built area, not a shed poorly built by the previous owners of the house
    2: make sure the door is flat before designing a light trap
    3: make sure the door can close AND latch once light seal is in place
    4: adjust the cutouts for the drain so that i don't have a hole 11" tall that needs a can of spray foam to seal up
    5: pretty much everything else.

  9. #19

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    Hello !
    My darkroom is *also* in a basement. The sewer pipe is beyond a large concrete wall and about one meter and a half above the darkroom ceiling.
    So i should have needed the bucket system for sewer ... But when you have a big bucket, one can put into it an electric pump, the king used for drain flooded basement. And put PVC pressure pipe to go to the sewer. Mine can push the water 10 m high and 50 m long. More than enough to reach the sewer pipe. Last but not least, you can use small diameter PVC pipe which make routing and piercing concrete walls easy. Mine use 25 mm diameter tubing.
    The pump looks like this one : http://www.manutan.fr/pompes-vide-ca...MDL1772-9.html the blue round pad is the automatic switch (when the water level make this float, the pump turns on). Make sure you have a pump designed for acidic water or rince the bucket twice with clean water in order to prevent rusting and seizure.

  10. #20
    Marco B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Lessons I've learned from darkrooms I've worked in or put together:
    ...
    Separate the safelight and regular light switches.
    ...
    My website

    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

    "Analog is chemistry + physics, digital is physics + math, which ones did you like most?"

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