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  1. #11

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    As Mr. Lambrecht, Mr. King, and others pointed out I incorrectly used the term “panchromatic” to describe modern black-and-white papers. Thank you for pointing out my error. The only panchromatic B&W paper of my experience is the discontinued Kodak Panalure paper for making prints of realistic tonal values from color negatives.

  2. #12

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    Using orange bulbs I bought from Ebay with Foma. No issues.

  3. #13
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bwrules View Post
    Using orange bulbs I bought from Ebay with Foma. No issues.
    You may want to take a closer look. Fomabrom and Fomaspeed Variant have a spectral sensitivity up to 580 nm. Kodak's OC filter has roughly 60% transmission at 580 nm. Indeed, Foma makes the following (very sound) statement about these papers:

    FOMABROM and FOMASPEED VARIANT III are ortochromatically sensitized photographic papers. Therefore, a suitable safelighting differing from that for conventional photographic papers should be used. Dark-red safelight filters for orthochromatic materials, e.g. Kodak GBX-2, Ilford 906, Agfa R1, Osram Duka 50, etc. in connection with a 15 Watt lamp, discharge lamp Sodium Vapor etc. are fully suitable. Because of its high speed, these papers should be exposed to this safelighting only for a time prerequisite to handling.

    In my experience Fomatone MG falls into the same category.

    Unsafe safelight are a common cause for a lack of print contrast.
    Last edited by RalphLambrecht; 05-15-2011 at 08:13 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  4. #14

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    Hmmm. Shouldn't I see fogging then, or is it more subtle?

  5. #15
    tomalophicon's Avatar
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    It may be more subtle. When I first used Foma papers they appeared grey. It was very subtle. I started using a red safe-light and things improved.

  6. #16

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    In my case they seem white, not grey.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by bwrules View Post
    Hmmm. Shouldn't I see fogging then, or is it more subtle?
    You can only truly appreciate the difference in a one-to-one comparison. Try to process one with the safelights on and one in total darkness. Also, be wary about other sources of light fog (enlarger, white walls, light leaks from doors and windows).

    On the other hand, your safelight setup may not provide much safelight exposure to begin with on and you may be OK because of that. A coin test as described in the pdf above will tell all about the efficiency of your safelight with Foma papers.
    Last edited by RalphLambrecht; 05-16-2011 at 05:12 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  8. #18
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bwrules View Post
    In my case they seem white, not grey.
    The paper base is not the issue. Paper requires a threshold exposure to show any density. After that, it only takes minute amounts of additional radiation to increase the density. That's why a safelight test, such as the coin test, must be conducted with lightly pre-exposed paper. Doing a test with unexposed paper is highly misleading.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  9. #19

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    Way back in the mists of time GE used to manufacture an item called "Ruby Bulbs".

    They were an incandescent light bulb with the glass bulb made from clear natural ruby crystal. They were not specifically designated for photographic use on the packaging but when I started working in family hardware store thirty years ago we had a mixed case of 25 and 40 Watt bulbs gathering dust on the shelf. If I recollect they had already been discontinued prior to my start in the business

    Needless to say I immediately placed the Habes Grabbus on them and have been using them in my darkrooms since that time with absolutely no fogging issuses.

    My current darkroom has four 4" ceramic lampholders mounted on the ceiling controlled by a separate switch mouned next to my enlarger with them installed.

    Hal

  10. #20

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    Thanks. I'll try the coin test.

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