Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,546   Posts: 1,572,986   Online: 901
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 13 of 13
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    florida
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,179
    Images
    2
    My sink of thirty-five years: 3/4 inch marine plywood, fiberglass cloth covering the bottom and a couple of inches up the sides and all including the tops* coated with marine polyester with almost 18% gray coloring added.

    * loose 3/4 inch plywood pieces that can cover the the sink to make additional work surface when the sink is not in use.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  2. #12
    Neanderman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Ohio River Valley
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    575
    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    Did you guys make a concave structure that remained with the sink <snip> did you build a sink out of wood and line it with fibreglass, leaving the inside/working surface as raw GRP then install the whole thing
    This was my approach (though I'm not sure what you mean by "raw GRP"...

    Did you build an anti-sink out of wood, line it with fibreglass, pop the wooden plug out and then just install the fibreglass shell?
    This could be one approach, especially if you were at all interested in making more than one (or if, as you indicate, you know someone who does this kind or work.) But for a one off, I think in the end it's a lot more work.

    Mine is really quite basic -- all of the internal corners are square. I drilled the hole for the drain before I glassed it to minimize swelling of the wood due to any leaks around the drain, (which is a non-type 316 stainless steel insert purchased at a home center, so it developed some rust spots pretty quickly) and I think I only used one layer of fiberglass cloth. At the most, I used two. I did put down multiple coats of resin, so I'd have as smooth a surface as possible. The resin was spread using a rigid plastic 'squeegee' of sorts that you can get at the auto parts store.

    Once the resin has hardened and is thick enough for your tastes, having a sander to smooth it out is helpful. I wish I'd had my random-orbit sander back then as I think I could have made it even nicer.

    I occasionally think about reworking it with some more fiberglass, but it's a big job and the sink is functional as it is, so I live with the little defects. Fiberglassing is an art and I am no master.
    Last edited by Neanderman; 06-07-2011 at 12:25 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: spelling, readability
    "I only wanted Uncle Vern standing by his new car (a Hudson) on a clear day. I got him and the car. I also got a bit of Aunt Mary's laundry, and Beau Jack, the dog, peeing on a fence, and a row of potted tuberous begonias on the porch and 78 trees and a million pebbles in the driveway and more. It's a generous medium, photography." -- Lee Friedlander

  3. #13
    BetterSense's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,881
    I also bought a 'bar sink' drain at Lowes. It immediately rusted.
    f/22 and be there.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin