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  1. #1

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    large volume processing

    Hi, I was wondering if anybody have any recommendation on processing large volume, like 4+ rolls of 120 at a time, of b&w film?

    I have heard those basket things that you can dunk, but can't seem to find any on ebay right now.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Jeff Bannow's Avatar
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    You can get inversion tanks that will hold 4x 120 rolls. I don't use them myself though because of the time it takes to fill and drain.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mouren View Post
    Hi, I was wondering if anybody have any recommendation on processing large volume, like 4+ rolls of 120 at a time, of b&w film?

    I have heard those basket things that you can dunk, but can't seem to find any on ebay right now.

    Thanks.
    The basket things usually hold a lot more than 4 rolls. And the tanks required are big, requiring a lot of chemistry. But the capacity is very high, like 12 or 16 stainless reels.

    Do you want to process a few more than 4, or a lot more than 4?

    I can get two rolls of 120 on a Paterson plastic spool in the dark every time without fail, so I can get 4 rolls into a tall Paterson tank easily. Since I happen to prefer the plastic reels that's what I would do if you're really talking about 8 or fewer rolls. Just do it twice.
    Michael Batchelor
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    Thank you for the replies, guys.

    I saw those 4 120-reels tanks, both SS and plastic, my main concern is uneven development as a result of long pour-in/out time.

    I could just darken out my bathroom, pre pour the developer into the tank, load the 4 reels, then dunk all 4 reels in at once. I have seen the Nikor tanks with a center rod.

    Do you know where I can find those baskets? I have just started this new project using MF, so, I am not entirely sure of the quantities yet. But I am pretty sure it will be more than 4 rolls at once.

    Thanks.

  5. #5
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Use a Jobo 1540 tank with two plastic reels [two rolls of 120 film each] and a Jobo processor. I used this combination to develop 12 rolls of 120 print film, four at a time using only 470ml.

    Steve
    Last edited by Sirius Glass; 06-16-2011 at 07:30 PM. Click to view previous post history.
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  6. #6
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    My largest ss inversion tank holds 6x120/220 rolls. When I use it, I pour the developer in the tank in the dark and lower the reels into the tank on a lift rod, put the lid on, turn on the lights and proceed normally. I think the most critical stage in terms of even development is when the developer first contacts the film, particularly if you use a dilute developer that is likely to be exhausted by the end of the development cycle like Rodinal or PMK or something like D-76 (1+3). If you use a developer with a short development time or that is reusable/replenishable, you might want to remove the reels in the dark and dump the developer with the lid off or set up a line with three tanks, since processing tanks are cheap these days.
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  7. #7
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mouren View Post
    Thank you for the replies, guys.

    I saw those 4 120-reels tanks, both SS and plastic, my main concern is uneven development as a result of long pour-in/out time.

    I could just darken out my bathroom, pre pour the developer into the tank, load the 4 reels, then dunk all 4 reels in at once. I have seen the Nikor tanks with a center rod.

    Do you know where I can find those baskets? I have just started this new project using MF, so, I am not entirely sure of the quantities yet. But I am pretty sure it will be more than 4 rolls at once.

    Thanks.
    What I'm talking about is using plastic reels double loaded (like Steve mentioned), so you have only two reels each holding two rolls of film. Fill/Drain time is significantly reduced from the really tall 4 reel tanks. Especially the stainless 4 reel tanks. But the method you mention of filling the tank, then dropping in the loading rod does work well from what I understand.

    And by your comments it seem you like the SS reels better than plastic, so that's a factor. Nothing like sitting in the wrong church pew to make a job hard!!

    I doubt anyone still makes the baskets and tanks that you could buy as a set. I've got a basket and a couple of tanks in the back of my closet somewhere that I delusionally bought once. I think they're 3 gallon tanks or something equally ridiculous. If my wife hasn't thrown them out as more of that darkroom junk, that is.

    Let me look for them this weekend, and if I have anything that's not trashed we can talk. You can tell from the fact that I don't quite know where they are that I don't use them much.

    MB
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
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  8. #8
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mouren View Post
    But I am pretty sure it will be more than 4 rolls at once.

    Thanks.
    Is it a requirement to do them simultaneously, or are you merely trying to be economical with your time?
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  9. #9
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    ... I pour the developer in the tank in the dark and lower the reels into the tank on a lift rod...
    I'm curious, why don't you preload the developer into the tank with the lights on? Surely the developer won't oxidize that much while you're loading the reels in the dark.

    I'm clumsy enough that I would have half the fluid in the sink if I tried to pour it in the dark.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  10. #10
    jp498's Avatar
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    I've got a patterson tank that holds 5 rolls of 35mm or 3 rolls of 120 (1.5L) It fills right up fast. I have the chemistry premeasured in a widemouth 2L gatorade bottle and the tank will take it as fast as I can pour it. I do mostly 12-15 minute development times and have no issue with uneven development. Filling or draining a combiplan tank is like molasses in comparison and I don't have uneven development in that system either if you need a comparison. Three rolls at a time is plenty, but if I had to do more, I'd get a second tank setup and process the 2nd tank 10 minutes behind the first.

    Some people also put 2 rolls of 120 on a spool as they can take upto 220 sized film. I haven't tried this.

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