Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,965   Posts: 1,558,403   Online: 823
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24
  1. #1
    pierods's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    311

    How to keep my water and chemicals at 20 degrees?

    The thing that takes the most time for me when developing film is bringing and keeping my chemicals and water at 20 degrees.

    Usually I develop from one to four 135-format rolls at a time, so that would be 250 ml to 1 liter of developer, same for fixer, and a few liters of water for washing.

    Are there devices that could bring these liquids at 20 degrees automatically?

  2. #2
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Monroe, WA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,468
    Images
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by pierods View Post
    Are there devices that could bring these liquids at 20 degrees automatically?
    You won't like the prices, but functionally it doesn't get any better than this or this used with a waterbath...

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  3. #3
    pierods's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    311
    Ken,

    prices are OK, I have euros...

    But what's the flow? Same as faucet? And also, do i have to mount them on the wall, or I can just do a hack job?

  4. #4
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Misissauaga Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,939
    Images
    29
    There are tools that allow you to process and account for the varied processing times at other than 20C.
    Old Kodak Darkroom dataguides going back many years included a dial . slide rule, or tabular calculator.

    The challenge with maintaining 20C is dependant on where you are. If your ambient temperture is 26C, then 20C maintenance is a different challenge than if your ambient is 16C.

    For my colour processing, which takes place at 38C, I use an old cooler (eskie for some parts of the world) as an insulted water bath. I use a fish tank pump and heater to circulate and temper the water. If your ambient is below 20C then the same solution can work.
    my real name, imagine that.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Live Free or Die
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,468
    Images
    90
    The thermostatic mixing valves that the links dis work too, and are much cheaper, but don't work quite as well perhaps.
    One problem mixing valves either electronic or not can't solve is cold water that's already warmer than 20C. To fix that you need a chiller which likely makes the intellefaucet look cheap.
    If you live in a warm climate and your cold water is too warm, the easist thing is to develop at some higher temperature that will be easier to maintain.
    Otherwise to can use an insulated waterbath of some sort that will help maintain 20C or whatever you decide on. A lot of people use ice chests for this.
    Ice in sealed plastic bags will help get the temp down also if you're trying to get to 20 and it's too warm otherwise.

    You don't have to mount the Intelefaucet on wall. You can set it up in whatever way you find convienient.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    284
    it might be a little snarky to even suggest it...

    but why keep them at 20?

    use a temperature conversion chart.... keep the chemicals out long enough to get up to "room temperature" and hope that room temp doesnt change as you develop.

    your room will act as your water jacket.

    http://www.ilfordphoto.com/applicati...and+white+film

    check out the PDF link at the bottom of the page..

    http://www.ilfordphoto.com/applicati...load.asp?n=430 (it is a pdf of their temperature conversion chart... print it out and tape it to the wall)
    "Where is beauty? Where I must will with my whole Will; where I will love and perish, that an image may not remain merely an image."

  7. #7
    agfarapid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    New England
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    182
    Images
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by pierods View Post
    The thing that takes the most time for me when developing film is bringing and keeping my chemicals and water at 20 degrees.

    Usually I develop from one to four 135-format rolls at a time, so that would be 250 ml to 1 liter of developer, same for fixer, and a few liters of water for washing.

    Are there devices that could bring these liquids at 20 degrees automatically?
    I don't know what your climate is like. I'm in the North East US and my darkroom is an unheated basement. Generally I find that a 1 to 2 degree shift won't matter a great deal. You might also consider shorter processing times. Lately I've been using HC 110 Dil B and my processing times have been under 7 minutes (usually 4 to 5). I've used Rodinal & Xtol as well and they usually require longer processing. Hope this helps.

  8. #8
    artonpaper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    325
    Images
    135
    One to four rolls is a small amount of film and hardly seems worth buying water mixing valves. In very warm weather I keep a jug of water in the frig. That can be mixed with tap water to achieve your target temperature. When diluting liquids with water remember if your developer is 5 degrees too warm, mixing it with equal amounts of water that is five degrees too cool will equalize to your target temperature. In very warm weather I fill a tray (dish) with water at the target temperature, using my cooled water and sometimes ice cubes. I then place my digital thermometer in the tray with all my bottles of chemistry and the tank. As I work, if the temperature starts to rise, I splash a bit of cool water in the tray. For my final wash, I have adopted the water bath technique. I give my film, after hypo clear of course, about 10 quick changes of water close to, but not always at my target temperature. Our tests at Brooklyn College have shown this to be as good, probably better, than letting running water flow over the reel.

  9. #9
    PDH
    PDH is offline

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    514
    I live in the Southwest, today it will 107 or 108 F and my tap water will above
    90F. While I am in the darkroom I usally crank the AC down to 75 so I can keep my developer, stop, fix, clearing agent, and wetting agent at 68 to 70 with just a water bath and a small bag of ice in the bath. For wash I made a chiller, 5 gallon bucket with coil of copper tubing sealed in the bucket. fill the bucket with ice and water. One bag of ice will chill for 15 mints which is long enough for the wash as use a clearning agent. For prints I have not found it nesscary chill, the 75 room temp seems to work without any ill effects.

    Before I made the chiller I used Dinafine which can be used from 60f to 90f, but the wash water was still so warm that the emlusion would come off in the wash.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,564
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    8
    i have some sort of plastic attachment that fits under my faucet and a thermometer
    screws into it ... ( and a hose at the bottom )
    i just have my water at 72º and fill a tray and tupperware container
    and when i do roll film with a normal developer and agitate &C.
    i just put my tank the tray/ tupperware ... between agitations and it works like a water jacket
    ... they say plastic tanks don't transfer heat, and metal ones grab your body heat
    and increase the chemistry temps ...

    when i tray process sheet film, i have my developer and 2nd water ( no stop ) in a print washing tray
    i use as a water jacket ... i drilled holes through and circulate running water at 72º ( or 68º depending on the developer )

    if the temp rises a degree or 2 i don't really worry about it ...
    if i was processing color film or e6 i would worry, but black and white i don't
    YMMV

    good luck !
    john
    Last edited by jnanian; 07-21-2011 at 10:01 AM. Click to view previous post history.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin