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  1. #11
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    If you intend to do colour in the future, I suggest buying into the Jobo system. The two more recent systems are the 1500 series and the 2500 series. The latter is larger and the plastic reels are easier to load. The former is smaller and allows - when using a rotary processor - great savings in chemicals. You can find specific stainless steel Hewes reels for the Jobo 1500 system.

    When you buy a rotary processor you must also buy a cog-lid to use your tanks with it. You need only one lid even if you have several tanks. E.g. you can buy 1510 (small tank for 1 reel), 1520 (tank for two reels) an then add "extensions" to arrive up to 5 reels (possibly more). With all those you could use the same cog-lid.
    You only need and can only use the cog lid with the lift. If you don't have the lift you use the regular lid and the magnet.

    I have the lift and it's worthwhile but sometimes buying a used Jobo one takes what one finds.

    But that isn't what the OP asked. I always found good plastic reels easier to load than steel (bad cheap plastic reels are horrid though) so can't help much. SS versus plastic is a hugely YMMV kind of thing.

  2. #12

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    Chris - the key to your problem may be the film reels you are using, but,after many years loading 120 film, because my customers needed pictures, I left S/S reels behind. Used Jobo plastic,and they still are the best plastic I have used. I have Kindermann 120 s/s,but would only use them in an emergency - although the construction and design is superb.
    Describe your AP reels -do they have a cutout in the edge - to push the film through, or the Paterson style ball- bearings ?
    And the dark-bag - any problems with sweaty hands, fabric getting in the way?
    The thing about stainless steel is that the natural "spring",acrossways,of 35mm film allows the s/s reel to ease the film into the spiral .
    . But most 120 b&w films I encounter are pretty thin-based, and they don't have the Spring . This means that bowing the film to allow it to ease into the metal spool is an invitation for the Killer -
    shaped "Pressure Marks ",where you bowed the film just a little too much . When you see them,they are crescent shaped white/black arrowheads permanently etched into your negatives.
    Plastic reels of either design pull the film into themselves in a lengthways direction - which IMHO,
    is the way to go. They do need a scrub with an old toothbrush from time to time.
    Another observation - All Tanks Leak. Collect it in a dish and re-add to the tank. Or: Check the gasket - absent ?
    Hewes & Nikkor are great,I'm sure, but they are both s/s, and use the same design principles described above.

  3. #13
    Wade D's Avatar
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    I use a 30 year old Paterson tank and reels and don't have problems loading 120 in a changing bag. Minimal leaks when inverted but it did that new. Humidity in the changing bag can be eliminated by putting a clean, dry, absorbent, lint free towel inside the back of the bag. Of course the reels must be clean and dry also. I tried the SS reels but didn't get the hang of it so I stuck with the Paterson.

  4. #14

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    Durst 120 plastic tanks do not leak, not even a drop. The tank top fit is so good. While the reel is plastic the films is feed into the middle by a loading apparatus which may be sold with the tank or separately. You do need this to use the tank. Once you have pushed the film under the spring loaded middle you simple wind the film on with the small plastic crank handle built into the reel via the feeder apparatus.

    It is inversion only so cannot be used on a Jobo which may or may not give you problems with colour film but other than that possible issue it ticks all the other boxes.

    pentaxuser

  5. #15
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    Durst 120 plastic tanks do not leak, not even a drop. The tank top fit is so good. While the reel is plastic the films is feed into the middle by a loading apparatus which may be sold with the tank or separately. You do need this to use the tank. Once you have pushed the film under the spring loaded middle you simple wind the film on with the small plastic crank handle built into the reel via the feeder apparatus.

    It is inversion only so cannot be used on a Jobo which may or may not give you problems with colour film but other than that possible issue it ticks all the other boxes.

    pentaxuser
    This Durst plastic tank must be one of the "mythical" daylight loading I have read about, but never seen neither in picture nor in person.

    I suppose it can be adapted to a Jobo non-lift machine by glueing on its bottom a proper magnet.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  6. #16

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    Hewes makes a film loader for their SS reels. I've never had one or used one, but it might help to avoid the crescent shaped creases if you want to load 120 film on an SS reel. Rather than go that route, I practiced a lot. I can now load 120 film on an SS reel without damaging the film.

    I use both plastic and steel reels and tanks. Lately I've been using Hewes 35mm and 120 SS reels in Jobo 1500 drums on my CPP-2. You'll need the special metal core with the 1500 series drum. They also work fine in any tank designed for SS reels.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    This Durst plastic tank must be one of the "mythical" daylight loading I have read about, but never seen neither in picture nor in person.

    I suppose it can be adapted to a Jobo non-lift machine by glueing on its bottom a proper magnet.
    No its a normal tank that looks like any other and has to be loaded in darkness. Good point about the magnet. I can think of no reason why it wouldn't work

    pentaxuser

  8. #18
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkipA View Post
    Lately I've been using Hewes 35mm and 120 SS reels in Jobo 1500 drums on my CPP-2. You'll need the special metal core with the 1500 series drum.
    Aarrgghh ... I've never seen any reference to this metal core. Can you post a picture? Is it difficult to find? Do you think Hewes still produces it?

    I was tempted to buy a couple of 135 SS reels for the Jobo 1500 series (I have some 1510 and a 1520) and I now see it wouldn't have been enough to buy the reels, and maybe I would have remained "stuck" without SS cores.

    Are the metal cores also produced by Hewes? In case, do they have a part number (for 1510, 1520 etc.). I don't find any information on the Hewes web site.

    Thanks for any information
    Fabrizio
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    If you intend to do colour in the future, I suggest buying into the Jobo system. The two more recent systems are the 1500 series and the 2500 series. The latter is larger and the plastic reels are easier to load. The former is smaller and allows - when using a rotary processor - great savings in chemicals. You can find specific stainless steel Hewes reels for the Jobo 1500 system.

    When you buy a rotary processor you must also buy a cog-lid to use your tanks with it. You need only one lid even if you have several tanks. E.g. you can buy 1510 (small tank for 1 reel), 1520 (tank for two reels) an then add "extensions" to arrive up to 5 reels (possibly more). With all those you could use the same cog-lid.
    By the time you buy a Jobo, you really should just invest in a phototherm sidekick

  10. #20

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    I use a 30 year old Paterson tank and reels and don't have problems loading 120
    Me too.
    I you are having trouble getting film started on the reel look under my name for a few posts on a simple trick for getting the film started.

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