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  1. #1

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    Time to purchase a new tank and reels

    Dear All, firstly this is an amazing resourceful site - ive had great help and advice so thanks everyone.

    The point of the post, I have an oldish AP tank with white plastic reels. I do find these very fiddley to load with 120 film in a changing bag plust the tank leaks on inversion, so i think really need to invest in a new system.

    I'd really like to use stainless steel reels as people seem to favour them. Can anyone recommend a systerm to purchase? Ideally i'd like the capacity to be able to process two 120 films at once.

    Thanks in advance

    Chris

  2. #2
    Rick A's Avatar
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    The general consensus here is Hewes brand, or old Nikkor stainless reels and tanks if they can be found.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  3. #3
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    If you intend to do colour in the future, I suggest buying into the Jobo system. The two more recent systems are the 1500 series and the 2500 series. The latter is larger and the plastic reels are easier to load. The former is smaller and allows - when using a rotary processor - great savings in chemicals. You can find specific stainless steel Hewes reels for the Jobo 1500 system.

    When you buy a rotary processor you must also buy a cog-lid to use your tanks with it. You need only one lid even if you have several tanks. E.g. you can buy 1510 (small tank for 1 reel), 1520 (tank for two reels) an then add "extensions" to arrive up to 5 reels (possibly more). With all those you could use the same cog-lid.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
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  4. #4

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    There should be hundreds of used SS tanks and reels available. Since you want to be able to do two 120 reels at a time you want what is called a 4 reel tank. The size is usually given as 35mm reel capacity. The 120 reels are sturdier than the 35mm reels, but make sure they are not dented. Nikor is another good manufacturer.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  5. #5
    Herzeleid's Avatar
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    I find it hard to load the steel reels in a changing bag and if you have a big steel tank in there. Loading the steel reel requires more delicacy and bit more space imo, otherwise you can bend and mark the film. It happened occasionally to me.
    Have you tried different plastic reels ? http://freestylephoto.biz/55043-Aris...eveloping-Reel
    I use another brand of this design. I find it far better to use.

    I am not speaking against steel system. I own both plastic and steel. But I no longer use steel reels in changing bag. I believe a changing tent is more suitable.

  6. #6
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    Don't expect stainless rig to be any better in the leaking dept.
    I own probably 4-5 plastic setups and 4 ss.
    They all leak to some degree.

  7. #7
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Regarding plastic reels becoming hard to load, the two most common causes are:

    1) Deposits of final rinse / stabilizer on the plastic reel. Although somebody says they are not removable, my experience is that a reel can become noticeably cleaner with: energetic brush with a toothbrush, warm water and dish soap; followed by a lot of dish soap applied on the reels and let it there for hours; followed by another vigorous brush while rinsing with warm water. Somebody cleans their plastic reels in a dish-washer (dish-washer soap is more "aggressive" than hand-washing soap). Colour treatment goes at around 40 °C so I would not wash them past that temperature ("economic" program).

    2) Humidity in the changing bag, due to seasonal heat and hands perspiration, made worse by the synthetic tissue falling over the hands. Remedies are: using a changing tent instead of a changing bag: in a changing tent there is an internal frame which keeps the tissue away from the hands and keeps the inner volume "large"; making some sort of a frame (with wood, plastic tubing, cardboard, wood, whatever) to put inside the changing bag so that it works like a changing tent.

    Hope this helps
    Fabrizio
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  8. #8

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    Stainless tanks with plastic lids do not leak according to my experience. I use Adorama branded (I think it's KALT) tanks. It has lasted 2 years so far with no damage. Lids are separately purchasable if you break them.

    I use Hewes for 35mm and generic for 120. I haven't seen too much variations on 120... at least not as much as 35mm kind.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  9. #9

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    I would go for SS tanks, but with plastic or vinyl tops (mine are Kinderman, and they absolutely do not leak). Older Nikkor tanks had SS tops, and the little filler cap can be trouble if it isn't the one made for that lid, I wouldn't buy a used one. For reels, I've always preferred Nikkor - they have a very simple "hooking in" device. If not Nikkor, then Hewes.

  10. #10
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    The one reason I don't like plastic tops for ss is they are slow to fill.
    I don't use them but now you guys mention it, I don't remember it leaking when I did try it.

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