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  1. #11
    ann
    ann is offline

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    Check out Ilford's site for some great pdf files on the process.
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

  2. #12

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    yup, i's just going to say...

    http://www.ilfordphoto.com/Webfiles/200629163442455.pdf

    the most important thing: the list of things you don't need (and people will tell you you do) is much much longer than the list of things you need. for example, in the past 30 years i have never owned, let alone donned or employed, gloves, apron, goggles, stirring rod, film cap remover, film leader retriever, plastic storage bottles, funnels, squeegee, washing bowl, hair dryer...


  3. #13
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    I agree with Vilk. Some can openers are perfect for removing film cartridge caps. A funnel is handy, though, if you use small neck soft drink bottles for chemicals. Kodak T-Max film developer can be reused, and has a long shelf life even when mixed. Stop bath and fixer can also be reused. With experience, stainless steel film reels are easier to use than plastic ones. For casual use, the plastic reels suffice.

  4. #14

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    Clearly mark all your chemical storage containers and be sure to download and print the processing instructions for your chemicals and keep them with your chemicals. Printing and having MSDS sheets would be nice as well, it helps to have them when you take your fixer to dispose of it. You should be able to get everything you need to get started processing for about $50 new. For now do not buy special chemical storage bottles, just wash out and reuse something you have, I keep my fix in an old windshield washer fluid bottle, developer is in an old acid jug I got from work.

    A tip: I have two empty 20oz water bottles that I keep with my processing stuff, one is marked DEV and has no cap, the other is marked FIX and has a cap. Both bottles have lines drawn on them at the fill level for my tanks. When I setup to process I put my chemicals in these bottles so that they are ready to go, the cap on the fix bottle is to prevent me from using it first (trust me, it's a good idea). The staging bottles are nice because they allow me to fill the tank faster with less risk of spilling.

    I keep all my stuff in a large wicker basket in a closet in the laundry room, and take it out when I process. Most of the year I process film in the kitchen sink, and in spring and fall I like to process outside on the porch.

    Have fun, and good luck.
    "Would you like it if someone that painted in oils told you that you were not making portraits because you were using a camera?"
    "Shouldn't it be more about the joy of producing and viewing the photo than what you paid for the camera?"

    Me

  5. #15

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    Being in Florida it is unlikely that your tap water is 68F. If you are going to use a film developer that will be diluted for a working solution, my suggestion is to keep a bottle of distilled water in the refrigerator. Since your stock solution will probably be over 70F having the cold water handy to use when diluting to the 68 or 70 degrees for developing. In addition to your selected chemicals you will need a developing (daylight) tank, reel(s), scissors, can opener for 35mm canisters, a (dark) room or changing bag, a timer of some sort, storage bottles, film washer or washing technique of your choice, a place to hang the film to dry with film hangers and an archival film storage system. All should be easy to find and not very costly.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  6. #16
    rmolson's Avatar
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    darkroom

    Welcome to the world of darkroom
    I have been doing this since I was 16 and I am 82 now and still am impatient to see the film as soon as it’s fixed! Don’t worry about the temperature of the water too much As long as it is at least below 75 .Our cold tap water in the city in the summer Here in Mansfield Ohio is 72 and so we standardized on72
    Bit of History, DuPont even recommended it As long as they are all the same temperature modern films are much tougher than when the recommendations were originally made .DuPont back in the 60’s tried to change the recommendation from 68 to71 or 72 as most people s thermometers were not that accurate and metol ,I think, activity drops off rather suddenly below 68. So they wrote it up for 72 for their film sheets, but the printer kept changing it back to 68 as an obvious typo . G—‘s Honest truth told to me by one of the reps back then.

  7. #17
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Here is Kodak's take on starting up:

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...bs/aj3/aj3.pdf

    If you have a room or a cupboard that you can make fully dark, it is much more comfortable to load reels there than in a changing bag. If necessary, you can load your reels and tanks at night, and then do your processing the next day in a more convenient and well lighted location.

    Those wide flanged plastic reels pictured above are of European manufacture and are sold under a number of brand names. I prefer them over the Patterson reels for 120, whereas I don't find that they make as much of a difference for 35mm. I see them most frequently under the AP brand - Freestyle sells them as "Arista Premium":

    http://www.freestylephoto.biz/55043-...el?cat_id=1603

    You are going to have to make a philosophical choice (some would say a religious one ) - plastic or stainless-steel reels. I own and waver between the two. If you are like most, the first couple of times you will struggle with loading the reel. Persevere, because it will become easy. One tip - heat and humidity do add to the challenge, especially with plastic reels.

    I've had 40+ years of fun doing this - hope you can enjoy it as much.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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