Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,901   Posts: 1,584,435   Online: 793
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23

Thread: Water Woes.

  1. #1
    Sjixxxy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Zenith City, MN
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    394
    Images
    18

    Water Woes.

    I'm one of the lucky guys with a no running water darkroom. Previously when I only used it for small contact prints, I just used RC to deal with the lack of water, but now that I got an enlarger, I want to start doing fiber again.

    The room is in a sectioned off part of the basement, and the closest running water is a small hose on the otherside of the basement that is primarily used to fill a big tank of water in the water softener system. Doing RC I'd just fill up two buckets and go dev->stop->fix->holding tray->few minutes in first deep bucket->into last deep bucket until wash.

    Think I could get by with a similar process with fiber? I'd like to try the TF-4 fixer to eliminate stop and permawash. The instructions say to rinse in running water between developer (I'll be using my old favorite Ethol LPD) and the fix. Is there really going to be enough carry over to affect the fix if I just slosh it around in an 11x14 tray, or better yet, dunk it a few times into a 5-10 gallon bucket of water? Then do the same for holding until I can transfer the prints to a wash? (Btw, This washer would fit in my bathtub, and satisfy the cheap bastard inside me, anyone know if it is a worthless piece of junk, or something just designed for RC?)
    Gear: Camera, Brain, Light.
    Website - FB

  2. #2
    BWGirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Wisconsin, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,050
    Images
    18
    I also have one of those wonderful waterless darkrooms!! (Think it's a WI thing??? ) I just started doing fiber, so I may not be the most knowledgable, but here is what I do... I develop, stop, fix; then I do a 5-10 min rinse in a large tub of water. Then into wash aid, then into a shallow tub of water (this is my holding bath) until I am done printing. Then I take move the prints from the holding bath to the tray I use to transfer things up to the bathroom where they get a leisurely soak in the tray in the tub. I change water 4 to 5 times in the tray & move everyone around so they don't get too cozy.
    I don't know if this helps any, but what the hey!
    Jeanette
    .................................................. ................
    Isaiah 25:1

  3. #3
    glbeas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Roswell, Ga. USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,307
    Images
    109
    You can do fiber in a "dry" darkroom as easily as RC. I think it's actually easier as fiber will tolerate long soaks better than RC, which tends to get water soaking in from the cut edges of the paper after too long a time.
    Gary Beasley

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Sussex UK
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    55
    Back in the 1960s I did my enlarging in my bedroom, and put the fixed prints into a bucket of water until I felt inclinded to carry them to the bathroom for washing. The reason for mentioning the date is that the prints I still have around from that time are still OK. The method may not be archival, but it seems to last for nearly forty years.

  5. #5
    Sean's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    New Zealand
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,594
    Blog Entries
    7
    Images
    15
    I recently ran all the plumbing to my darkroom and it wasn't that painful. A few rolls of that flexible grey piping, some joints, and a crimper tool. Not sure what your current pipe situation is but in NZ mine was easy, cut my main line, crimped on a T junction, then ran the pipe, crimped on the joints that screw to a faucet, done. Could be a DIY problem though if you have all copper piping..

  6. #6
    Dave Parker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,049
    Here in the states, if you have a Home Depot, they make some pretty easy lines to use for doing a darkroom, it got a bad rap a few years ago when it was being used for stuff it was not designed for, it is called quest and I have done a couple of darkroom plumbing setups with it and it works great, very easy to splice into existin plumbing as everthing is either screw together or crip fit, and really pretty cheap, won't really break in freezing weather and holds all the pressure that most applications require, I just plumbed the new shop for doing glass with it and spent less than $100 to do it and the shop sits about 50 feet from the house.

    Dave Parker
    Satin Snow(TM) Ground Glass

  7. #7
    Sjixxxy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Zenith City, MN
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    394
    Images
    18
    Water pipes do run across the ceiling, but they are all copper. I don't have enough plumbing experience to hack them and make a split. I think it would also be a problem that the nearest drain is all the way on the otherside of the basement. I'm also contemplating moving to a different state, so I'm not up for doing any investments on anything permanent that I might abandon in a month.
    Gear: Camera, Brain, Light.
    Website - FB

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,042
    Do you have those garden tap kits over there where the clamp for the tap cuts into the pipe and seals it at the same time? If you do maybe a kit could provide a nice inexpensive option to get running water.

  9. #9
    Dave Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Middle England
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,894
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by TPPhotog
    Do you have those garden tap kits over there where the clamp for the tap cuts into the pipe and seals it at the same time? If you do maybe a kit could provide a nice inexpensive option to get running water.
    Also sold for washing machine connections. However it's sometimes more of a problem getting rid of the waste water, as it seems in this case.
    Regards Dave.

    An English Eye


  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,042
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Miller
    Also sold for washing machine connections. However it's sometimes more of a problem getting rid of the waste water, as it seems in this case.
    Mmmmm good point, how about a couple of ex-forces water carriers like on the back of a landrover. The water could be transfered to them and the caps put on so water didn't slop all over the house on the way to the drain? All that would be needed on top of that is a reasonable sized funnel.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin