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  1. #11

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    I agree it seems the best way to mount it would be on something that could swing under the lens so that it is centered. But I also agree this thing is largely a waste of money and I never ended up using mine on any fine prints. Although the light passes through a diffuser, the overall light source is still too small an area in my opinion, and therefore does not result in uniform illumination over the easel. And while the timer is nice, I did not find the illumination level to be precisely constant.

    In the end I bought a small clunker Durst 35mm enlarger with a crap lens for $10, cranked the head up to max, defocused, stopped the lens down, and I flash with that enlarger. For anyone who has enough space for a small 35mm enlarger, this is really the best way to flash. You get even, uniform illumination every time, and you can even use different contrast filters if necessary, add neutral density to create long flash times for localized flashing etc. The RH paper flasher is a cute little device, but if you really look at what it is, it should be $10.

  2. #12
    jeroldharter's Avatar
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    The rh flasher is excellent. Depending on your enlarger and lens you can mount it to the lens board without it getting the way. I put mine on a second enlarger that I don't use as much and calibrate the flasher at a standard height. The test strip function is nice though. I certainly don't think it is overpriced assuming that time is valuable. I have no idea why "waterproof" is useful for a flasher.

    The main things I like are reasonable flashing times, repeatability, test strip function, small size.
    Jerold Harter MD

  3. #13
    RH Designs's Avatar
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    To answer the OP's question, the two versions differ only in the construction of the timer; operation and performance are identical in both versions. We changed the design because the plastic cases we used for the Mk.1 were discontinued by the manufacturer. The Mk.2 is not waterproof, but the smooth fascia is wipe-clean.

    Those who criticise the price might like to attempt to run a small electronics manufacturing business in these over-taxed over-regulated times. If I could sell stuff cheaper I would. Fortunately I don't have any kids to support else I would have thrown in the towel long ago.
    Regards,
    Richard.

    RH Designs - My Photography

  4. #14

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    I'm another happy owner of a RH flasher. As with jeroldharter above, I find the accurate timing and repeatability very useful. Sure you can do flashing with just a foam cup but the RH product makes it an easy and repeatable process.

    I agree that it is not cheap, but I understand the economies of producing a specialised product, and to me it provides good value.

  5. #15

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    May 2005
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    Daventry, Northamptonshire, England
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    I believe Les McLean uses this flasher as well as the rest of the range of RH Designs products. He always struck me as a person who appreciates value for money and isn't given to buying high priced but poor value products.

    However each potential user has to do his/her own value analysis, of course.

    pentaxuser

  6. #16

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    One big advantage with using the RH flasher instead of a separate enlarger is that is easy to flash only a part of the print instead of the whole paper. I tape a sheet of clear acetate to the easel, mark out the area to be flashed, hinge it out of the way whilst exposing from the neg then flap the acetate back over the paper and mask out the area not required to be flashed in the usual way. With the flasher there is no image to see except where you have outlined on the clear acetate. I reckon it's a great tool, wouldn't be without it, worth a box of paper.

    Tony

  7. #17

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    That's a nice tip Tony! Cheers for that one

  8. #18

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    ...shame that it's not waterproof. Does it go "beep" when you've successfully fogged your paper?

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