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  1. #1
    Sjixxxy's Avatar
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    My awsome pink darkroom.

    Thought I'd take some pics of what I have set up as a dry darkroom. See if anyone has any good feedback for it. I used it last summer to do some small contact prints and didn't have any problemscept that I couldn't print larger then 4x5. It passed every print fogging test I could throw at it in. 8.5 Feet x 10 Feet, with plenty of headroom for the enlarger to go as high as it can. All images are clickable for larger versions.



    Here is the entryway. A few big sheets of heavy black material used as a doorway. When inside I seal the bottom with the bricks seen on the floor. Though this may not be entirely necassary now that I'm not working on the floor. (Just moved the dresser in yesterday)




    The mighty D-II on a big wooden dresser. I left a large enough gap between it and the wall so that I wasn't bumping into the wall. I should probably hang some more black cloth next to the wall. Seems to be some light spillage from the enlarger head that hits the wall. There are little wheels on the dresser so if I need to relocate it for larger printing, or any other reason, it should pose no real challenge.



    Some 1950's era diner tables to serve as a developing stand. I'll probably wrap them in some big plastic sheets and periodically replace them to take care of any spillage.



    The safelight. Far enough away from anything important, and reduced in brightness to make it pass the safelight fogging tests that I ran last summer.

    Anyone see any major issues with this set-up? Only one I can think of is the dust, as evident by all the "ghosts" in the photos. I figure I can run my humidifier in the room for a while before I start and hopefully knock most of it out of the air. Any suggestion? I wish that it was at least sheetrocked in that corner, but I get to work with what I got, so unfinished dusty pink insulation it is.
    Last edited by Sjixxxy; 10-20-2004 at 12:42 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo
    Gear: Camera, Brain, Light.
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  2. #2
    david b's Avatar
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    I am so jealous.

  3. #3

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    You are good to go bubba, it is far better than my first darkroom. Congratulations! Lets see some prints now.

  4. #4

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    Hell of a lot more hightech then mine...

    good job...

  5. #5
    bmac's Avatar
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    all I can say is... Awesome!
    hi!

  6. #6
    RAP
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    Just a note on safety. I know I always wore filter masks and gloves when installing insulation so as to not breath in the fiberglass fibers. Maybe you should put up some plastic over the insulation. Or better yet, sheet rock the room and finish it off.
    Time & tides wait for no one, especially photographers.

  7. #7
    rogueish's Avatar
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    RAP is correct. If your insulation is NOT covered (plastic sheet) your running risks of future lung problems. Fiberglass insulation is great for homes, bad for you. Lots of people worry about how bad the chem fumes might be, but never think twice about all the other stuff(dust) they might be sucking up.If your not up to the sheetrock task, fine, but do staple up some plastic wrap. You'll might also find it makes a difference with humidity.
    Looks like a sweet set up, Here's to some fine printing!

  8. #8
    Joe Lipka's Avatar
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    So far so good. The folks that suggest you finish off the walls because of safety are half right. Really more important than your health is the fact that you will probably go blind trying to spot all the dust marks from the fiberglass insulation that will magically be attracted to your negatives and prints.....

    You should finish the walls soon.
    Two New Projects! Light on China - 07/13/2014

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  9. #9
    titrisol's Avatar
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    Darkroom looks great!
    Those banquet tables are awesome for many purposes. Also try getting those plastic drawer carts from Wallyworld, very good for storage.

    Fiberglass dust is bad for you and for the pictures. Not so efficient for the house either.
    If I build a house/addition I'll try to get the "sprayed" foeam insulation.
    Mama took my APX away.....

  10. #10

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    With a similar problem (insulation) in my darkroom and no $$ for sheetrock, I draped with visqueen (sp?) 7mm black plastic. Been working Great! I agree with all prior comments about health and fiber interference during printing. My darkroom is 52' x 30' and 15' high at the apex (no ceiling, just roof line) and it only cost about $200 for enough to cover all walls and all roof insulation.

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