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  1. #21
    rjr
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    Chuck,

    in "Entering Germany" Tony Vaccaro talks about his Army time in the late WW2 - he enlisted as a photographer and accompanied some infantry troops (IIRC).

    In one chapter he talks about how he processed the films he took with his Argus - he used a tent and dunked the film in steel helmets.

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...books&n=507846

    Ok, back to topic.

    No, there is no washing agent that may be used in place of water. IIRC there was research on super stabilisators in the early 1990s, but it was a dead end.

    I use the Ilford method for washing films, it is safer/more archival than flowing water. Actually this is the "Agfa method", they recommended it since the 1950s for the Rondinax.

    http://www.largeformatphotography.in...or/ilfwash.pdf

    If you need to speeden up the drying process, you could use ethanol - dunk the reel in it for a minute, let the emulsion soak the ethanol and hang it. it will be dry in a few minutes. Perhaps you should rewash it later when you are back home... just to be sure. That method usually was applied by press photographers who didn´t care for archival processing... but for speed.

    Tetenal has a ready made bottle of this stuff - "Drysonal". Expensive Ethanol. ;->

    To cut washing times you need to speeden up fixing. Use a two bath fixing (>always fresh fixer, always "clean"), keep fixing times short (double/triple clearing time) , add a soda bath (20g sodium carbonate per liter) after that and you may save a bit on the watering step.
    Tschüss,
    Roman

  2. #22

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    I'm only doing FILM DEVELPOPING (developing what I've captured and insuring my negs are in zone) before I leave..lots of good ideas...please keep them coming....Thanks...Chuck....

  3. #23
    Aggie's Avatar
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    Actually you don't need fresh water to rinse in. The navy would rinse their film in sea water and then for the final minute use the precious desalinated water. You can use just about any water source, short of dirty water, to rinse with. just remember to do a final one minute rinse or 1 fill and agitate before you are done. Other wise the fill the tank 7 times works great.
    Non Digital Diva

  4. #24
    Jeffrey A. Steinberg's Avatar
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    If money is no object, get a Jobo ATL-1500 and mount it on the table near the fridge.
    --Jeffrey

    ______________________________________________
    Jeffrey Steinberg, K2MIT
    Scarsdale, NY

    www.jsteinbergphoto.com (my avocation)
    www.reversis.com (my vocation)

  5. #25

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    This website shows the product of a very clever inventor. He sells a tabletop studio, film and print darkroom, all in a 3 foot by 5 foot stainless box. Perhaps you can learn from him.

    The site takes a long time to load. Wait for it. You won't be dissapointed.

    http://thzig.freeyellow.com/

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck (CA)
    Is there a WASHING AGENT that does not require constant running water....guess I'll have to check into Motel 6 once a week to do laundry, film developing/contact printing, computer work...

    Thanks
    Chuck
    I've read somewhere that Hydroginperoxide eliminates fixer chemically.

    G.
    Wilbert
    http://www.photovergne.com
    Cours photo en Auvergne

  7. #27
    RAP
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    Developing while on the road can have its advantages. Judging the negative while on location is obvious.

    One thought is the varying quality of water in various locations. Variables like iron, sulfur, water hardness will greatly affect your development times. Water hardness will shorten your times. I would think you would need to have a consistent supply from a known source just for your film development. Maybe try bottled water from one company just for film. Better yet, distilled water is readily available in markets. Do some tests and see how that works. Then you can buy as you travel.

    The other steps will not matter where the water is from. A hypo clearing agent is a must. It will greatly shorten your wash times. You can wash partially and then give a full wash when you get home.

    Try rigging some sort of pump and filter system for drawing water from a lake or stream.

    If shooting 4x5, use HP Combi tanks instead of trays.
    Time & tides wait for no one, especially photographers.

  8. #28

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    If all you are doing is processing 35mm and 120 film and you have chemicals, tanks, reels and a changing bag--you're set. Rinse the film with a couple of tanks of bottled water after fixing, use a hypo clearing agent and do the film soak thing instead of using running water. Everything else would be your standard procedure.

    I would suggest two things. Buy a residual hypo test kit and run a home test on your film processed this way to be sure the water soak procedure is working. Also, if your changing bag doesn't have an internal frame, get one.

    Although this is more hassle than I would want while traveling, it shouldn't be too hard to accomplish if you're willing to take the time and effort. Good luck.

  9. #29
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    To eliminate water concerns you can get a small deionizer filter.
    Probably 4 inch diameter and 2 feet tall.

    Or buy a few gallons of distilled water @wally world every other town
    Mama took my APX away.....

  10. #30
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    Chuck,
    Sounds like fun, but remember! It is an offence to process films whilst driving Regards. BLIGHTY.

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