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  1. #11
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    The "swirl" marks around sprocket holes are *usually* caused by "cavitation" of the developer, due to too - vigorous agitation.

    Unless they extend into the image area, I wouldn't worry too much about them. If they do, I'd slow the agitation down, especially the "twirling".
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  2. #12
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    If those small ripples are dark and kinda crescent shaped they are likely pinch marks where the edge of the film was crimped during handling. Such pressure marks will act the same as if light hit the film in those points and develop black.
    Gary Beasley

  3. #13
    sterioma's Avatar
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    Everybody, thanks for the feedback and encouragment. I am really proud of the results myself, it was really fascinating (almost magical) seeing the negatives coming out from the reels with some image on them!

    As far as the marks around the holes are concerned, now that you mention it something did happen at the end of the loading, possibly a small jam. Hopefully with some more practice I will become more proficient in loading.

    Can't wait to process the next one!!!
    (it's going to be the same but for Rodinal diluted as 1+25 (7min). Want to see how the grain will change)

  4. #14

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    Whoo hoo! A magician is born. I developed my first roll a few weeks back in class. I am addicted now. In school they use water instead of stop bath. I only use stop for my prints. Tried it both ways in the developer and printing. I like the water stop better. Just my opinion...

    Congrats!!!

    David Savkovic

    My home page

  5. #15
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    Excellent! congratulations.

    As per Rodinal dilution, look for a thread on the BW film, paper chemistry about it.

    The dark marks can either be crimping while loading the reel (since it is the last frames only) or too much agitation. I've found that Rodinal gives a longer tonal scale when agitated only once per minute (after the initial 30 or 45 seconds)
    Mama took my APX away.....

  6. #16
    ghinson's Avatar
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    What follows might be a loaded question. Sorry.

    I developed my first roll last week in class. I want to start doing this at home. I live in an area with only 1 camera shop and it takes my 2 weeks to get back BW 120 roll film. That is unacceptable. Down the road, I will have a darkroom. For now, I have a dark closet. Good enough for loading.

    I'd like suggestions as to what chemicals to purchase for my home exploits. I will be shooting 35mm and 120, using Tmax 400, Ilford Delta 100, and Tmax 100. I would love to hear suggestions even as to specific brands of stop bath, fixer, etc., as well as developer.

    Thanks!

    Greg

  7. #17
    Blighty's Avatar
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    Dear Sterioma,
    Great to welcome another devotee of the black art. Like Lee Shively, I too had a flashback to my first processed film (FP4 in Promicrol, I think) some 30 odd years since. I've had my share of disasters too! Just a shame this forum wasn't around in 1973. Speaking for myself, I,ve always found that inversion agitation works better than the twiddle stick, but that's the beauty of this craft; ask a million different photographers and you'll get a million different answers. Enjoy yourself, regards, BLIGHTY

  8. #18
    rogueish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghinson
    What follows might be a loaded question. Sorry.
    I'd like suggestions as to what chemicals to purchase for my home exploits. I will be shooting 35mm and 120, using Tmax 400, Ilford Delta 100, and Tmax 100. I would love to hear suggestions even as to specific brands of stop bath, fixer, etc., as well as developer.

    Thanks!
    Greg
    So far I have been using Ilford brands of chems and films, and have no complaints. Currently using Ilford HC (which is a concentrate) diluted 1+31, Ilfostop and Ilford RapidFix. At the time (about 18 months ago) a 4 litre jug of fix was all I could get, so I've been using it forever. My next developer will be Rodinal. (the brainwashing transmissions from the Rodinal Militia are getting to me). I also like the Delta series of film, have you tried FP4 and HP5? I am currently using Kodak TX400 for night class assignments.
    Yes it does take forever to get B&W or 120 film back from the labs. But B&W 120 film! I'm surprised you get it back in the same month! :o

  9. #19

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    Good Morning, Greg,

    I'd go for a liquid concentrate such as HC-110 or T-Max. Do the dilution immediately before each batch instead of mixing the concentrate into a stock solution as suggested by Kodak. The amounts of concentrate will usually be no more than a couple of ounces (probably less with HC-110) unless you process many rolls in each batch, so get a small graduate which can easily measure fractional-ounce amounts.
    There's nothing wrong with powder developers such as D-76, but they have to be mixed and stored. Forget stop bath; just use water.

    Use a Rapid Fix (I like Kodak's for film, Ilford's for printing.) just because it's quicker. Don't forget Hypo-clear such as Perma-wash to save both time and water. Finally, use Photo-Flo. Use a much, much, much more dilute solution than suggested on the bottle. (A couple of drops in enough water to cover a 35mm reel should be enough.) One small bottle should last you for years.

    Konical

  10. #20
    titrisol's Avatar
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    Hiya Greg.
    I'd reccomend that you use a longer life developer such as Kodak HC110 or Ilford DDx or AGFA Rodinal (each of them is different)
    Which developer did you use in class?

    As per stop and fixer, doesn't make much difference. I'm partial to liquid fixer concentrates and I'm using the Record brand (generic) lately with good results.




    Quote Originally Posted by ghinson
    What follows might be a loaded question. Sorry.


    I developed my first roll last week in class. I want to start doing this at home. I live in an area with only 1 camera shop and it takes my 2 weeks to get back BW 120 roll film. That is unacceptable. Down the road, I will have a darkroom. For now, I have a dark closet. Good enough for loading.

    I'd like suggestions as to what chemicals to purchase for my home exploits. I will be shooting 35mm and 120, using Tmax 400, Ilford Delta 100, and Tmax 100. I would love to hear suggestions even as to specific brands of stop bath, fixer, etc., as well as developer.

    Thanks!

    Greg
    Mama took my APX away.....

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