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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    I have no idea why you would need a separate vent pipe.



    If you are going to do the hot and cold yourself then don't waste your money on a plumber for the much simpler waste pipework.


    Steve.

    I should clarify. Your added drains need to be vented for proper operation. Depending on how and where the added drains connect to your existing drain pipe, you may need to add a vent those new drains (typically connecting to a single vent going through the roof).

    You probably have 1 or 2 plumbing "stacks" going up through the house. If more than 1, they connect in the attic and vent through the roof (though they could each have a vent through the roof). If your new drains connect near the bottom of that stack, you'll need to connect a vent pipe to an existing vent. If they connect near the top, you'll probably be OK without a separate vent.

    The fitting I mentioned is supposed to eliminate the need for adding vent pipework. It allows "one way" passage of air into the drain, essentially making the indoor air your vent. Haven't used one, so don't know how well they work.
    Last edited by mgb74; 11-24-2011 at 10:12 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by mgb74 View Post
    I should clarify. Your added drains need to be vented for proper operation. Depending on how and where the added drains connect to your existing drain pipe, you may need to add a vent those new drains (typically connecting to a single vent going through the roof).

    You probably have 1 or 2 plumbing "stacks" going up through the house. If more than 1, they connect in the attic and vent through the roof (though they could each have a vent through the roof). If your new drains connect near the bottom of that stack, you'll need to connect a vent pipe to an existing vent. If they connect near the top, you'll probably be OK without a separate vent.

    The fitting I mentioned is supposed to eliminate the need for adding vent pipework. It allows "one way" passage of air into the drain, essentially making the indoor air your vent. Haven't used one, so don't know how well they work.
    It will be one additional drain that will have to run in the crawl space approximately 8-9 feet to tie into the where the tub drains. So, if I understand your post, since it will connect at the bottom in the crawl space near the main vent stack, then an additional vent will be needed from the new drain to the existing main stack. My home is small with only two vents, one for the kitchen drain and the one (much closer) that is the main vent stack for the tub, bathroom sink, toilet, and the washing machine.

  3. #23
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    In the UK, we generally have just one vent stack. Drains from sinks, basins, baths, etc. drain into an outside open drain with built in trap rather than going straight into the stack, although that is the usual method when adding a drain somewhere. I have never heard of anyone needing additional venting to the standard 4" stack.

    An alternative to a vent stack is an air admittance valve. Do you use those in the US?

    In Victorian Britain, almost every connection to a drain had a separate anti-siphon pipe installed. This didn't actually do anything of much value and hasn't been used for about 100 years.

    Steve.

  4. #24

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    Yes, air admittance valves are used here; http://www.oatey.com/Channel/Shared/...ve_20_DFU.html

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by CPorter View Post
    It will be one additional drain that will have to run in the crawl space approximately 8-9 feet to tie into the where the tub drains. So, if I understand your post, since it will connect at the bottom in the crawl space near the main vent stack, then an additional vent will be needed from the new drain to the existing main stack. My home is small with only two vents, one for the kitchen drain and the one (much closer) that is the main vent stack for the tub, bathroom sink, toilet, and the washing machine.

    If it's connecting in the bottom of the crawl space, with tub (and presumably toilet) above, I would think you would want that vented. You could try it without and see if plumbing drains well but I would use one of vents I mentioned (I looked and they're call "cheater vents" or "check vent").

    I'm guessing they're the same as what Steve Smith called "air admittance vents".
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by mgb74 View Post
    If it's connecting in the bottom of the crawl space, with tub (and presumably toilet) above, I would think you would want that vented. You could try it without and see if plumbing drains well but I would use one of vents I mentioned (I looked and they're call "cheater vents" or "check vent").

    I'm guessing they're the same as what Steve Smith called "air admittance vents".
    Thanks for the info you guys, I appreciate it. I will keep the "check vent" in mind when I get a plumber here------tomorrow, I hope to get the sink itself made, will be an 8 foot bottom and 32" wide as I hoping to accomodate some 16 x 20 printing some day, but mostly it will be 8x10 and 11x14.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trond View Post
    I have filters and mixing valve mounted on a panel. Two taps are regulated and one is for cold water. All the taps are filtered.
    Attachment 42020
    It would have been nice to spread out more taps along the entire length of sink, but using garden hoses I can reach all parts of the sink.

    Trond
    Thats a very nice setup. Do you have a tubing bender?

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    Thats a very nice setup. Do you have a tubing bender?
    Yes, and the panel was surprisingly easy to build. The only problem I encountered was that I ordered the mixing valve and water filters from the US, without thinking about incompatible threads... But that was solved by buying some bits and pieces on eBay.

    Trond

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by CPorter View Post
    Besides having a regulated water temperature mixer in the darkroom, how many of you also planned for and installed just the basic unregulated hot/cold faucet as well, and if so, why? I'm finally able to devote some money toward getting my darkroom built and the plumbing is foremost on my mind. I've gone through the "Darkroom Portraits" thread and it seems that there are a fair amount that have both---I'm wandering if those that have both were planned that way or was the unregulated faucet already part of the room where the darkroom is? I will be turning a spare bedroom into a darkroom, and getting the hot and cold supply in will be simple enough, but from there I have some decisions to make.

    Thanks in advance.
    thiis what iuse and it's great!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Intellifaucet.jpg  
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  10. #30

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    I put in a standard tap, with hot and cold, and then also ran a pipe with multiple taps which runs tempered water in my last darkroom. I am in the process of building yet another darkroom which will be much simpler, since I live in an area with exceptionally bad water and will be mixing all of my chemicals from bottled water, and will be using running water far less. I plan on relying much more on my jobo processor to maintain temp for film processing.

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