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  1. #31
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    Plumbing Woes

    The plumber tells me venting the drain will be an issue. Here in Kentucky the code is that each unit, meaning each sink drain, must be individually vented to the main venting system. In other words, just installing a p-trap and running the drain down through the floor and to the closest drain piping in the crawl space, even though it is vented properly will not meet Ky Code. I'm told that if I lived across the river in Indiana, all that would be required is just what I metioned----installing a p-trap, then running the drain piping to the closest location, in my case, it would be the pipe draining the washing machine about 12 feet away in the crawl space.

    This is driving the cost up, obviously, and is a big downer, but it has to be done. But rather than going into the wall with the vent piping and then up, it will actually have to be an exposed vent pipe adjacent to the wall, going up and through the ceiling, into the attick, make a turn and ran to tie into the main vent stack. Alternatively, it could just keep going straight up with another roof penetration, but that is out of the question.

  2. #32
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Code or no, if your plumber tells you you need a vent for proper operation. I'd follow the advice.

    Proper operation of a drain may keep you off your hands and knees mopping the floor...

  3. #33
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    That being said, I've run a sink without a *direct* vent before and with the low levels of darkroom chemicals/print washing I never once came close to seeing anything back up. The drain was still plumbed into one of the main drains that the washer went into, so it may have had an indirect vent of some sort.

    Either way, wasn't a problem for me, but it wasn't code legal either.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

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  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    Code or no, if your plumber tells you you need a vent for proper operation. I'd follow the advice.

    Proper operation of a drain may keep you off your hands and knees mopping the floor...
    I'm going to do it, my home owner's insurance probably would not cover me if something bad happened and it was not installed to code. But what I find irritating is why it is code in one state and not another, leads me to believe it is not really necessary.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    Code or no, if your plumber tells you you need a vent for proper operation. I'd follow the advice.
    I wouldn't. I would just put in something which works.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    I wouldn't. I would just put in something which works.

    Steve.
    My initial feelings are along that thought, but there's obviously more to consider.

    The first plumber I had here for an estimate of the job is the one that told me about the code being different across the river in Indiana, but then he proceeded to tell that he would install it against code if I wanted him to, as if I have a choice. Right away, I am suspicious of this fellow and the type of job that he would do. The next plumber, yesterday morning, tells me that he will not do it against code and informs me that it is illegal for him to do so, apparently, there is no such choice that can be offered from a licensed plumber, it is either done by state code or he won't do it. He was also much more thorough in his whole approach to the job task.

  7. #37
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    Do you plan to sell the property in 5-10 years?

    Do you have to get the modifications inspected by the county?

    Do you care if your heirs have an issue?

    Or do you have the leisure to come back sometime in a couple of decades and rip it out for the next round of improvements?

    The code issue might be stupid government interventionalism at the behest of a plumbers union, but it it isn't going away. So forget that hope. The question I would ask myself is will it ever become an issue for me. If so, then "my what a nice vent line." And if not, well then it's not.
    Michael Batchelor
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  8. #38

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    It's more of a liability thing. If a professional does it and it's against the code, he can be held liable. Not only would insurance not likely cover damages as a result, if someone be injured, he can be held liable for that, too. No professional of any kind will knowingly do things against code, if he values his livelihood.

    I wouldn't discount insurance factor either.... you'd be amazed how much damage water can cause. Unless installation is such that any leakage will safely drain to outside, such as garage, you may be looking at a potential for a huge loss - which insurance may not help you at all.

    Ultimately, it's how much risk you can tolerate and assume. My risk tolerance is relatively low, so I wouldn't do it.....
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  9. #39

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    Codes change over time. What makes a certain practice acceptable at one point of time but not another? Or in one locality and not another? Some municipalities are more strict and some may be less reluctant to change.

    That said, I'd be leery of a plumber who would do something contrary to code.

    But are you sure that the air admittance valve mentioned in post #24 does not meet code in your location? If you haven't already, I would download the relevant info from the mfg and specifically ask your local inspector.
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    I wouldn't. I would just put in something which works.


    Steve.
    Haaaa. My advice comes from having something in that doesn't work.

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