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  1. #1
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    sink construction

    Just wandering how many of you that built your own sink from plywood used dado grooves to attach the sink sides to the sink bottom----this has been my plan, but now I'm wandering if that is the best way to do it. On one site, I saw where the instructions were to double the thickness of the sink bottom, then attach the sink sides with screws, alternating the screw location from low to high as you screw in the sides. That seems much simpler to me than the dados. Thoughts?

  2. #2

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    I used ply covered with masonite then several layers of spar varnish. The corners are just stuck together and I used sealant there and at the drain. -- I was able to give the bottom about a 4 inch in 6 ft angle and then the last foot with the drain is flat.

    the whole sink has a 2x4 frame and the sink part is surrounded by this frame.
    * Just because your eyes are closed, doesn't mean the lights in the darkroom are off. *
    * When the film you put in the camera is worth more than the camera you put the film in... *
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  3. #3
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    Screwed and glued 3/4" marine grade plywood sinks.

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    I haven't done it yet, but I'm going to be making my own sink. My plan is to use 3/4 ply lined with 3mm PVC sheet. I intend to make a base covered with 3mm PVC, then add the ply sides standing on top of the base screwed in from the bottom. I will then have shallow sides that I can add in using the PVC sheet using solvent adhesive. A thought is to groove the bottom of the ply sides to add a strip of PVC first (i.e. an inset very short side of say 15mm) to glue to the base and then the proper side PVC will glue to both the base and the strip. I have seen that other people have made PVC lined sinks and it sound better/easier to me than trying to paint/seal the ply.

    be interested to hear from others who have done this already.

  5. #5
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    My sink is over 20 years old. It is built of plywood covered with West Systems Epoxy. This is made for boats and available at marine supply shops. When mixed it becomes thin enough to soak into the wood and seal it. I used 3 coats and have never had to repair it.
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  6. #6

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    +1 on the epoxy. My sink has a 2x6 frame with a marine plywood bottom. The whole interior is epoxied, then got a coat of epoxy paint. Still pretty new, but my last sink was made the same, the epoxy coat was 10 years old or so- and showed no signs of giving up the ghost.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr rusty View Post
    I haven't done it yet, but I'm going to be making my own sink. My plan is to use 3/4 ply lined with 3mm PVC sheet. I intend to make a base covered with 3mm PVC, then add the ply sides standing on top of the base screwed in from the bottom. I will then have shallow sides that I can add in using the PVC sheet using solvent adhesive. A thought is to groove the bottom of the ply sides to add a strip of PVC first (i.e. an inset very short side of say 15mm) to glue to the base and then the proper side PVC will glue to both the base and the strip. I have seen that other people have made PVC lined sinks and it sound better/easier to me than trying to paint/seal the ply.

    be interested to hear from others who have done this already.
    I built sinks like this a few years ago and they work great. I did cut dadoes for the sides to set into and then glued and screwed everything together. Each sink section is 8' long.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DSC01012.jpg   DSC01014.jpg  

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    Finished the construction of the sink yesterday. I decided against the dado joints, only because I'm not skilled with a router, I had one available to borrow but I've never used one and so chose the simpler route, fearing that I may screw up the job and waste money. I saw on line a sink constructed by doubling up the sink bottom with 23/32 plywood and attaching the long sides with screws as shown, alternating every other screw high to low. This is a very sturdy construction, a bit heavy but that's ok. Still have to install the drain and make the stand for it, slowly but surely. I used liquid nail adhesive between the two bottom pieces and 1 1/4" screws systematically throught the bottom surface area. The available sink surface area is 30" x 96"
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails sink1.jpg   sink2a.jpg   sink3a.jpg   sink4a.jpg  

  9. #9

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    Looks great so far.

    Couple of other suggestions -

    See in the photos of Langedp's sink he has used foam strips on the front of the sink. These are split foam insulation for water piping from someplace like Home depot. Highly recommend you put these in to rest your elbows on.

    Strongly suggest that you think carefully whether you want to sit or stand at your sink. I made the base of mine at a height so I could sit at a tall stool (with back support) and I'm very glad that i did. I know that many people make theirs to stand up at, but I don't think my back could take 3 - 4 hour sessions standing up.
    Dan's website: www.dandozer.com

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Dozer View Post
    Looks great so far.

    Couple of other suggestions -

    See in the photos of Langedp's sink he has used foam strips on the front of the sink. These are split foam insulation for water piping from someplace like Home depot. Highly recommend you put these in to rest your elbows on.

    Strongly suggest that you think carefully whether you want to sit or stand at your sink. I made the base of mine at a height so I could sit at a tall stool (with back support) and I'm very glad that i did. I know that many people make theirs to stand up at, but I don't think my back could take 3 - 4 hour sessions standing up.
    Thanks for the tips, I have already considered the foam padding, but had not considered the possiblility of wanting to sit at the sink, thanks.

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