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  1. #1
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    My passenger was not phased.......

    ....but I had the s__t scared out of me today----had to get on the brakes hard to avoid a collision while on the way to go photographing. Inside the pack, my Horseman 4x5 L-frame monorail, a 210 Rodenstock Sironar-N and Nikon 120SW lenses. The pack is belted in tight, but the tripod slammed the glove box, but it's ok. Anyone else ever had such an experience?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails P1060012.JPG  

  2. #2

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    Yes.... I experienced that long time ago. Since then, I put anything heavy in the passenger side foot well or in trunk so that in case of accident, it has less chance of becoming a projectile.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  3. #3

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    Oh yes. Once years ago, riding around Oregon with a friend, my Nikon on the back seat, my friend decided I wasn't stopping quickly enough. So, she yelled "STOP!" at the top of her lungs. I did, in fact, have things under control but I slammed on the brakes, thinking there was something I had missed... Camera went onto the floor, of course. Everything was fine except that the plastic lens hood took the brunt of the impact and was quite shattered. I love lens hoods. Two other times they have also saved cameras and lenses that I dropped.

  4. #4

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    STOP everyone... DON'T PANIC!!

  5. #5
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    Chuck - Thankfully I have not had the misfortune, glad you are safe!
    Andy

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by zsas View Post
    Chuck - Thankfully I have not had the misfortune, glad you are safe!
    It was just one of those deals, previously, every time I buckled that pack in it seemed kind of silly, but it paid off. The sturdy L-framed Horseman, was not as much of a concern, I think the big payoff was the lenses, I can see where they maybe could've been damaged if the pack hit the dash the wrong way, even though I have them packaged the best I can.

  7. #7

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    My beloved F2AS took a tumble off the roof of a taxi cab (impatient driver in a hurry to score his next fare) at Hartsfield Airport a number of years back. Beyond a nice big dent on the top of the DP-12, a crack across the same, a small dent near the frame counter and a bit of black paint removed, the the camera survived intact. In fact, I used the camera until 25 December 2010, shooting my last roll of PKM with the body in Yahoo Country's (the province of Alberta) Jasper National Park. The camera was officially retired at that time.

  8. #8
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    Many, MANY years ago, I placed an SLR, big lightmeter and tripod on the back seat of my car. The seat had a cushion that sloped toward the back and it sort of cradled the stuff -- what could go wrong?! As I passed through a neighboring town, a cat ran out in front of me. Now I'm not crazy about cats anyway (and less so since) but I instinctively planted a large foot on brake pedal and it slid the contents of the rear seat into the well in front of the seat.

    No apparent damage was done, but it has helped me remember to anchor things better. My preference is to have them on the floor, either in front of the passenger seat if I'm alone, or in the well behind the driver's seat if I'm not alone, or stopping where I want them less visible. That way the most they can do is slide a bit without a sudden change in elevation. It can be a challenge with a small car and a bunch of large gear.

  9. #9

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    A few years ago, the old diesel Suburban had an injector problem, and couldn't make it up a hill. A towtruck operator hooked it up, and winched it up onto a flatbed. Just as the 'burb reached the top of the flatbed, the winch gave way, and the truck went flying backwards off the flatbed with the winch cable still attached. The driver went running downhill, after the truck, and I ran and dove under the front bumper of the flatbed, expecting the 3-ton 'burb to snap the winch cable, which would then snap back and cut the driver in half. Fortunately for him, the front wheels of the 'burb hit something, and the truck turned and smacked into a guardrail, backwards, at about 30 mph.

    The 12x20 Korona and the No 10 Cirkut, both in their Pelican cases, and the V8 Deardorff, in its' Calzone case, as well as the two Orvis reel cases full of lenses were thrown every which way, landing on their sides, upside-down, etc. Everything survived absolutely intact.

    I considered it a near-death experience.

    Charley

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by c.d.ewen View Post
    A few years ago, the old diesel Suburban had an injector problem, and couldn't make it up a hill. A towtruck operator hooked it up, and winched it up onto a flatbed. Just as the 'burb reached the top of the flatbed, the winch gave way, and the truck went flying backwards off the flatbed with the winch cable still attached. The driver went running downhill, after the truck, and I ran and dove under the front bumper of the flatbed, expecting the 3-ton 'burb to snap the winch cable, which would then snap back and cut the driver in half. Fortunately for him, the front wheels of the 'burb hit something, and the truck turned and smacked into a guardrail, backwards, at about 30 mph.

    The 12x20 Korona and the No 10 Cirkut, both in their Pelican cases, and the V8 Deardorff, in its' Calzone case, as well as the two Orvis reel cases full of lenses were thrown every which way, landing on their sides, upside-down, etc. Everything survived absolutely intact.

    I considered it a near-death experience.


    What I intended to say is Oh Shit!! on many levels.

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