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  1. #11

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    Thanks for posting this advice guys, it will help me home in on it. I just souped some film and got much better results this time around, due in part to a combo of the info written above...
    "I'm the freak that shoots film. God bless the freaks!" ~ Mainecoonmaniac ~

  2. #12
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    All the information you will ever need and much more is here: http://www.trenholm.org/hmmerk/


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    All the information you will ever need and much more is here: http://www.trenholm.org/hmmerk/
    I have that bookmarked, it is great but so is dialogue...
    "I'm the freak that shoots film. God bless the freaks!" ~ Mainecoonmaniac ~

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by CPorter View Post
    I wonder in this situation, would it be better to just leave the lens plane un-tilted and just focus the way I did and stop down, without messing with Schiemflug---this being equivalent to pointing my 35mm down at the leaves and doing the same thing.

    I have a feeling the answer is just practice, practice, practice, like most other things.

    Thanks
    Chuck
    I think you may have answered your own question.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  5. #15
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    Thanks for all the info folks. I was going through some papers and found an article that I obviously forgot I had, printed from http://www.largeformatphotography.info/. However, the article is no longer there that I can tell---it's called, Check List For View Camera Users by Howard Bond, since it does not seem to be there, I'm going to quote something from it, it seems to point to the issue I was having. Item #7 on his check list is:

    "CHOOSE TWO FOCUSING TARGETS - These should be in the plane that is to be made sharp and at different distances from the camera so their images will lie some distance apart on the groundglass, one above the other for a tilt, and beside one another for a swing. Sometimes two suitable targets aren't available in the plane to be made sharp (this was my trouble the other day). In that case, you can take advantage of the fact that a tilted plane of focus moves parallel to itself when the focus knob is turned, just as it does with a rigid camera. Choose two targets that are in a plane that is parallel to the one you want to make sharp. After these target imagages have been made sharp with the help of swing or tilt, turn the focus knob to move the focus to the desire plane."

    Anyway, he goes on to describe his "Focus/Check" method, which, when reading it again, seems cool----bottom line, it's practice, practice, practice.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    I think you may have answered your own question.
    I think you're right.

  7. #17

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    I do not have a lot of view camera experience, but my method has always been to pick something about in the middle to focus on, then use tilt or swing to bring the near and far objects into focus. Often I have to adjust the main focus inbetween. I just go back and forth, adjust main focus, adjust tilt and swing, adjust main focus, adjust tilt and swing, and so on, until I have everything sharp where I want it. This was intuitive for me, I didn't think about it much, just did it.

    In some ways that is very strange as I am the analytical type.

  8. #18
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    This helps me with initially setting up tilts-

    The focus plane, lens plane, and film plane will meet in a point somewhere. Take an imaginary line through your front standard (parallel through the lens board), rear standard (parallel thorough the film plane), and through your subject where you'd like the focus plane to be. These three lines/planes need to meet for your focus plane to be where you think it is. This is easiest to visualize when trying to get the focus plane to "lay down" across a flat object. I use this method a lot to determining where my focus plane is, like on this shot:




    I shot this image at f/16 with a 150mm lens from about 2'-3' away. My DOF at that aperture and distance was about 6", but I managed to get the whole surface of the piano (about 6'10") in focus. The three planes met at a point about 18" below the camera, so I had to use a ton of tilt. If you were trying to get your plane of focus to lay down on the ground while having the camera 5'-6' up on a tripod, you would need much less tilt.
    Last edited by rjbuzzclick; 05-17-2012 at 12:37 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Reid

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/rjbuzzclick/

    "If I had a nickel for every time I had to replace a camera battery, I'd be able to get the #@%&$ battery cover off!" -Me

  9. #19
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    Merklinger's ebooks are the most comprehensive technical coverage of the topic I have read. The reading is "thick" - there is a lot of trigonometry, though he promises to avoid math (he pretty much fails on this promise). But if you persevere, you will develop a very rich understanding of just what is happening when you begin to tilt (or swing).

    The relationship between controls changes in surprising ways once you tilt. For example, how much you tilt and where you set your focus changes your depth of field. More tilt means less DoF. Depth of field itself is different. The depth of field becomes something measured in vertical height, not in horizontal distance (in the case of tilt - for swing, think sideways width). It is a wedge, growing larger with distance. And (especially with landscapes, as opposed to macro work) small tilts make dramatic changes in the angle of the plane of sharpest focus. It goes horizontal very quickly, like with less than 3 degrees of tilt. That's the thing that surprised me at first. I needed very, very small tilts to get close and far objects in sharp focus. It was only in macro work, where the focus was very close, that I found myself applying larger swings or tilts.

    I also understand, based on my reading of Merklinger, that as you shift your focus, the plane actually swings around what Merklinger names a "hinge" line, located below the lens, rather than "moving parallel to itself" as Bonds was quoted as saying above. I'll let them argue it, but Merklinger's math makes sense.

    How does all this abstract math help in the field? Not much. I just tilt and wiggle and focus the camera until everything I want is in focus... But reading the books did help me internalize what was going on optically. Highly recommended reading.

  10. #20

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    rjbuzzclick, your sig is hilarious, I think I have about a dollar in nickels spread across all my camera bags, back packs, etc...
    "I'm the freak that shoots film. God bless the freaks!" ~ Mainecoonmaniac ~

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