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  1. #21

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    MA
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    Hi Elliot,

    I'm going to follow Michael's advice and not worry too much about it. Maybe not the best choice of words, but by 'vertical play' I was trying to describe how the rear standard can move (pivot) very slightly (I'm talking probably less than a mm but still enough to be noticeable) even after focus lock because the L-bracket attached to the rear standard does not fit snugly into the groove along the outer edge of the focusing track. Perhaps it's wear-and-tear or it was never a snug fit to begin with (assuming there's no other adjustment that would lock it down). However, in practice it's not a problem because the focus is set when the back is 'at rest', which it always returns to, despite the aforementioned play, when the film holder is inserted.

    Again, it hasn't had any effect in the field just seemed a little odd as all other adjustments lock down tight.

    I do appreciate all your help.

    Thanks!

    Carl

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    1,153
    Hi Carl: Appears to be the best approach. Surely Michael would know.

    Best of luck.

  3. #23
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Sep 2003
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    the villages .centralflorida,USA and Germany
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    elliot and carl,
    it's about time an engineer will join you and fix all thesw mechanical problems!See ya soon.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
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    My KMV is relatively tight which is good considering its almost as old as me. I couldn't find a KMV 5X7 reducing back, but was able to use one from a B&J. Been using the 5X7 format more so than 8X10.
    Ralph, hope we Floridians can get together once you arrive this Winter.
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    138

    Restoring my Kodak Mast View 8x10

    How do you clean the camera? Just water or alcohol?

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    138

    Restoring my Kodak Mast View 8x10

    Do somebody have a link for the cork? I checked Michael's website but did not find it.

  7. #27

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    1,153
    HI Stig: The cork is available at many art supply stores. The material comes in thin sheets with self adhesive on one side, and the cork on the other. Simply cut the length of cork sheeting that you need, trim to the correct width, and affix to the metal piece-one piece of cork "sheeting" on each side. Works quite well.

    Elliot

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    1,153
    I thought that users of the KMV will benefit from the following.

    I had travelled to Jackson, Mississippi and was photographing at an interesting Confederate burial ground and a near-by abandoned tenant farmer’s home when I noted that the top slider which holds the lens board in place was hanging down. As many of you know, the original screws holding the top slider were rather flimsy. Moreover, such original screws can, of course, no longer be located. I had fashioned a make shift solution when I purchased the camera. However, if one uses the new KMV lens boards from Michael Smith one will find that the new boards are considerably “stronger” and “thicker” than the original Kodak boards. Such boards (although an improvement), put added stress on the mounting screws holding the top slider. Indeed, one might find it a bit difficult at first to work the new lens boards under the bottom lip and slide the top slider over the top of the board. Needless to say, it was impossible to find the small screw amongst the weeds. Moreover, even if the screw was found, I did not have a small hex wrench to reattach the screw onto the camera. Also, I had no tape to hold the board in place at the top right side.

    Obviously I did the best that I could; one does not travel 700 miles and pack up without trying to photograph. Hopefully the new lens board will have been thick enough so that light will not have found a path behind the board. We shall see.

    The solution? After appropriate cursing and head shaking, my friend and I went to the local Ace Hardware store. I had done the same thing here in Florida when trying to solve the “problem” , and of course found that the store had no appropriate screws. Needless to say, the store in Jackson-although having thousands of screws of both metric and machine measurements- did not have any screw that worked. We went to a “fastener store” and of course they did not have anything to replace the “original screws”. My friend who is a retired Professional Engineer and is very familiar with all manner of nuts, bolts, screws, etc. and the very helpful young man at the counter thought that “retapping” the original hole and using a modern machine screw would be the best solution. The bellows on my camera is mounted such that top of the bellows is BELOW the hole where the screws holding the slider is located. Hence, there was no danger of ruining the top of the bellows if the replacement screw was too long. So, the two of them carefully “retapped” the original hole ( start with a tapered tap and then use the straight tap ) using a small “tap wrench”. They then screwed in a standard 4-40 ¼ inch machine screw and adjusted the tightness so that the slider was easily moved yet very secure. The length of the new screw is perfect; there is no protrusion of the screw behind the board, and no risk of damaging the bellows or the camera. Of course, we could have clipped the back end of the screw had such been needed.

    Done! The new screw is a standard size, easily found at any hardware store and thus simple to replace. The new screw is much “stronger” and the top end of the thicker lens board is held more securely in place. The downside is, of course, that the camera is no longer “completely authentic”. However, I think you might agree that the advantages of not having to worry about having a situation similar to mine is worth having two “non authentic” screws.

    Elliot
    Last edited by Mahler_one; 11-18-2012 at 10:26 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #29
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Sep 2003
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    the villages .centralflorida,USA and Germany
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mahler_one View Post
    My friend who is a retired Professional Engineer and is very familiar with all manner of nuts
    just like all of us professional engineers.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  10. #30

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    1,153
    Ah Ralph...I was waiting for your response!

    Give us a call when you are back home....

    Elliot

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