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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Whiteymorange View Post
    .......Try a little moderate heat on the shutter during an exercise session. It's an old repairman's trick that sometimes works. I have heard three or four reasons why it works; none is completely believable, but it does seem to help at times.
    Hello, What are the 3 or 4 reasons you have heard?

  2. #12

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    Heat reduces the viscosity of the old oil and grease. That is the only reason, and it is not a substitute for proper maintenance.

  3. #13
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    Nothing is really a substitute for proper care and maintenance. True. But I have heard that the exercise does tend to loosen up shutters when dust and old grease have created a sort of "threshold of resistance" to movement that is overcome by moving the parts back and forth through the timing cycles. I have also heard that it redistributes the old lubricants and that it releases tension built up in parts under spring lad over the years––in other words, when a shutter is left in tension (not set on "T"), the metal begins to deform slightly. Releasing that tension through use helps the parts realign. Another helpful trick that seems to support this last bit is to use a hair dryer to warm the shutter for a few minutes before the exercise.

    All of this may be complete bull. All I do know is that I have had some luck with long-unused shutters after exercising them. A proper cleaning and lubrication (only where indicated on a particular shutter– some were designed to run dry) is a far better bet in the long run.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Whiteymorange View Post
    Nothing is really a substitute for proper care and maintenance. True. But I have heard that the exercise does tend to loosen up shutters when dust and old grease have created a sort of "threshold of resistance" to movement that is overcome by moving the parts back and forth through the timing cycles. I have also heard that it redistributes the old lubricants and that it releases tension built up in parts under spring lad over the years––in other words, when a shutter is left in tension (not set on "T"), the metal begins to deform slightly. Releasing that tension through use helps the parts realign. Another helpful trick that seems to support this last bit is to use a hair dryer to warm the shutter for a few minutes before the exercise.

    All of this may be complete bull. All I do know is that I have had some luck with long-unused shutters after exercising them. A proper cleaning and lubrication (only where indicated on a particular shutter– some were designed to run dry) is a far better bet in the long run.
    1) Metal that is deformed has been stressed beyond it's elastic limit, it has no 'memory' and will not go back to it's original shape.

    2) Warming the shutter wil help release any 'grip' the old contaminated lubricants may have formed.

    3) Warming the shutter will, by reducing the viscosity, help redistribute the old, deteriorated, contaminated lubricants. This is not a good thing.

    4) if you value the longevity, accuracy, and reliability of a shutter or any mechanism you will have it cleaned, lubricated, and adjusted by a competent technician.

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