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  1. #21
    M.A.Longmore's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LoganCAdams View Post
    90 percent of U.S. Canola is genetically modified. How would it be hazardous to my health?
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    If you have to ask, I won't waste my time telling you ...
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    Sanjay Sen - APUG Subscriber
    Sanjay Sen, 36, a champion of human and animal rights, died June 3 in a motorcycle accident in Wayne, New Jersey.

    July 23 1975 - June 3 2012

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  2. #22
    M.A.Longmore's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    Nobody knows.
    For the moment if you buy a rapeseed oil bottle you might want to check the country of origin.
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    Thank You, My Good Man !

    Enjoy The Weekend !

    Ron
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    Sanjay Sen - APUG Subscriber
    Sanjay Sen, 36, a champion of human and animal rights, died June 3 in a motorcycle accident in Wayne, New Jersey.

    July 23 1975 - June 3 2012

    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    For the moment if you buy a rapeseed oil bottle you might want to check the country of origin.
    Rapeseed and Canola are two different crops. Rapeseed has a different mix of fatty acids and is not approved for human consumption, but it is used as a coating in the production of certain plastics. Canola is an edible crop.
    Dave

    "She's always out making pictures, She's always out making scenes.
    She's always out the window, When it comes to making Dreams.

    It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up."

    From It's All Mixed Up by The Cars

  4. #24
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    Avoid wearing brightly colored clothing, especially floral prints.
    This goes along with #1 – don't look like a flower, either. There's a reason beekeepers wear white. If you're wearing bright colors, you are just asking bees to land on you. Keep your outdoor wear limited to khaki, white, beige, or other light colors if you don't want to attract bees.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  5. #25
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    What about UV?
    IIRC, bees can see in the UV range. Possibly some nasties like yellowjackets could too.
    Some detergents have brighteners which fluoresce to make clothes look brighter. Do they fluoresce in the UV range as well as our visible range?
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  6. #26
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mopar_guy View Post
    Rapeseed and Canola are two different crops. Rapeseed has a different mix of fatty acids and is not approved for human consumption, but it is used as a coating in the production of certain plastics. Canola is an edible crop.
    I don't know what you mean for different crops. If for Rapeseed we mean Brassica napus it is allowed for human consumption provided it does not exceed a certain percentage of erucic acid, which according to Wikipedia in the EU is 5%. Canola is just a Canadian commercial denomination of oil obtained from certain varieties of rapeseed. Rapeseed oil produced outside of Canada I presume cannot be sold as Canola, which doesn't mean Canada is the only country to produce edible rapeseed oil.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
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  7. #27
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Flowers blooming all over the place here, but no bumblebees or honeybees. Last summer there were lots, but in midsummer I noticed a dieoff of bumblebees. I found a dozen or so scattered in our driveway and along the walks here.

    It is so sad. All I see are flies, mosquitoes, sweatbeezs, hornets and wasps. We had a lot of butterflies here this year as they released several thousand courtesy of a local environmental group. These were all Red Admirals.

    PE

  8. #28

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    Dave

    "She's always out making pictures, She's always out making scenes.
    She's always out the window, When it comes to making Dreams.

    It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up."

    From It's All Mixed Up by The Cars

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Flowers blooming all over the place here, but no bumblebees or honeybees. Last summer there were lots, but in midsummer I noticed a dieoff of bumblebees. I found a dozen or so scattered in our driveway and along the walks here.

    It is so sad. All I see are flies, mosquitoes, sweatbeezs, hornets and wasps. We had a lot of butterflies here this year as they released several thousand courtesy of a local environmental group. These were all Red Admirals.

    PE
    Many of the bees you think of as bumblebees are probably carpenter bees. At any rate, most of the big fat bees that should, some say, be able to fly are carpenters.

    We just had a major die off of carpenter bees and we know what did it. We did. Bayer sells a couple of systematic insecticides whose active ingredient is imidicloprid. We've used one of them for years on our Tropical Milkweeds (Asclepias curassavica). Unlike the native milkweeds we keep, A. curassavica doesn't go dormant in fall. Like the others, it acquires aphids in the fall, and we've lost plants to them. Bayer's wonder stuff solved that problem. It also solved the scale insects on our sand cherries. So last year when a couple of our Japanese Hollies were infested with small sap-sucking insects we treated them with the stuff. Problem solved. But when the hollies bloomed and the carpenter bees came to feast on the nectar and gather the pollen many many of them died shortly after they tried to fly away from the plants. Dozens every day until the hollies have finished blooming. Our local carpenter bee population seems to be rebounding.

    Re insect pests, we once went on a picnic/fish collecting trip to the Rio Frijoles (or was it the Rio Frijolito?) where it crosses pipeline road. This is in the former Canal Zone. There was a honeybee hive under the bridge -- a high trestle -- over the stream. Africanized honeybees. Something about us, we don't know what, bothered them. They attacked my wife first, then everyone in the party. We had to leave.

  10. #30
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    We call the big fuzzy black and yellow bees "bumblebees" as they seem so awkward when "waling" or flying. They love our Rhododendron flowers in June and the Azalea in May-June. They are friendly and will land on your hand and just bumble around. Not like the honeybee. The hornet is most aggressive and will sting for no reason. The honeybee must be provoked, and I have never heard of a bumblebee stinging.

    PE

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