Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,735   Posts: 1,515,401   Online: 1100
      
Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 44

Thread: Moving to 4x5

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    NC
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    81

    Moving to 4x5

    I pulled the trigger and am now waiting on its arrival. In the mean time I started doing a lot of research on tray developing and other things to help me transition from 6x7 to 4x5. It seems that there are a lot of these treads so I thought I would put together a list of links that I have thus far found useful.

    If you have any suggestion or links to add PLEASE do!

    Loading 4x5 film holders by Paul Butzi:
    http://www.butzi.net/articles/filmload.htm

    Processing Sheet film in Trays (special thanks to Doremus Scudder, your description great these videos made me understand what you were trying to say)
    http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...1&feature=plcp

    Film Data Index with Notch Codes (not sure how complete it is):
    http://photondetector.com/tools_ref/filmdata/

    Lastly this site! It has been very helpful and I appreciate all of the users and moderators. Again if you have any suggestions my Speed will not be here until next week and I am trying gain as much info to help me as possible.

    ~M
    "Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst." Henri Cartier-Bresson

    Guess I have a long ways to go :-)

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Adirondacks
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,292
    You forgot a great one, www.largeformatphotography.info

  3. #3
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,411
    Images
    2
    An alternative to tray developing.

    http://www.mod54.com/buy.php
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    822
    Images
    41
    Development falls into a few broad categories - tray, tube, spiral, and deep tank, with a number of variations within each (open trays/sloshers, Jobo, Combi-Plan/Deep tanks and hangers). Everyone has a favourite 8-)

    Unless you plan on using many film types, the actual notch code is not that important. I have trouble 'reading' them in the dark anyway, apart from working out the emulsion side. Just work with one emulsion type at a time.

    Don't forget some sleeves for the processed film. Usually individual envelopes rather than sheets at 5x4 and up.

    Graham
    Last edited by grahamp; 07-03-2012 at 01:51 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Typo
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  5. #5
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    San Francisco area
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,806
    Images
    1
    I only add this: Be very careful if you buy or obtain LF film in the UK. i.e. we use 4x5 but they use 5x4.
    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

    Richard S.
    Albany, CA (San Francisco bay area)

    My Flickr River of photographs
    http://flickriver.com/photos/rich815...r-interesting/

    My Photography Website
    http://www.lightshadowandtone.com

  6. #6
    X. Phot.

  7. #7
    Perry Way's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    San Luis Obispo, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    825
    Blog Entries
    13
    Images
    118
    BTZS Tubes are a huge step up from tray developing (though you'll still be tray fixing) and can be done mostly in the light. I will never tray develop again. You get 6 tubes and a large tray/tank you float the tubes in and rotate them with your fingertips. Works actually very well and much faster to handle than using the Jobo 4x5 reels (loading the reels fully - with 6 sheets per reel - is problematic for a lot of people)
    I love the wilderness and I love my trail cameras, all Fuji's! :) GA645, GW690 III, and the X100 which I think is the best trail camera ever invented (to date).

  8. #8
    jp498's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Owls Head ME
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,431
    Images
    73
    You will want to keep your film dust free from film box till processing. This is often overlooked in the how-to's. I wasted a bunch of film and ruined a couple nice photos learning this. I use anti-static bags for the film holders. Other people have clean containers or lunch coolers to keep film holders in.

    I keep processed film in printfile pages just like smaller formats. You may also need a bigger enlarger or scanner depending on what you have. Enlargers and el-lenses are dirt cheap used.

  9. #9
    LJH
    LJH is offline

    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    517
    Quote Originally Posted by Perry Way View Post
    BTZS Tubes... much faster to handle than using the Jobo 4x5 reels (loading the reels fully - with 6 sheets per reel - is problematic for a lot of people)
    Perhaps for the 2XXX tanks, but I would argue the 3006 is the easiest product to load in this arena.

    Price, though, could be prohibative.

  10. #10
    Pioneer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Elko, Nevada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    944
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by Perry Way View Post
    BTZS Tubes are a huge step up from tray developing (though you'll still be tray fixing) and can be done mostly in the light. I will never tray develop again. You get 6 tubes and a large tray/tank you float the tubes in and rotate them with your fingertips. Works actually very well and much faster to handle than using the Jobo 4x5 reels (loading the reels fully - with 6 sheets per reel - is problematic for a lot of people)
    Everyone seems to have their favorite method for developing their film. I use the Jobo system for my 4x5 film because I have 3 reels and can develop up to 12 frames at one time. But loading film in the reels is a bit tedious and you have to be careful not to cross load in the slots. That is not a problem with BTZS tubes, loading them is super simple. One sheet of film rolled and slid into one tube. Cap it and you are loaded. I use the BTZS tubes for my 8x10 film and they certainly are convenient.

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin