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Thread: New to 4x5

  1. #11
    Jenni's Avatar
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    Awesome advice guys. I'll continue to use this camera. But I do see a press camera in my future. I am a portrait photographer so sometimes I want to be down low with my subject should they be on the ground or what have you. I can't wait to do more with it!

  2. #12
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    I'd recommend a Super Graphic, or a Toyo 45A, even a Linhof Technika (much more expensive), as they have reasonably good movements and the firstb two aren't much more than a Crown Graphic. They can all be used handheld.

    Ian

  3. #13
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    The Toyo 45A is the camera I ended up with, it is truly a joy to use.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #14
    Jenni's Avatar
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    I was looking at the Toyo, so many options!

  5. #15
    Dan Quan's Avatar
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    Master Technika or Horseman VH-R?
    DanQuan.com
    stand in the place where you are

  6. #16

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    The Toyo 45A and All have really come down in price on the used market lately. A good friend of mine has the 45A. It's a great camera. Toyo 45A and All's are made of metal and are sturdy.

    I own a Sinar P. It's a joy to use for portraiture. It's big and heavy and doesn't move if you are clumsy like me and bump it. Just make sure that you mount it on a heavy, sturdy tripod.

  7. #17
    Jenni's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Quan View Post
    Master Technika or Horseman VH-R?
    I was looking at both.

  8. #18
    Jenni's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Gales View Post
    The Toyo 45A and All have really come down in price on the used market lately. A good friend of mine has the 45A. It's a great camera. Toyo 45A and All's are made of metal and are sturdy.

    I own a Sinar P. It's a joy to use for portraiture. It's big and heavy and doesn't move if you are clumsy like me and bump it. Just make sure that you mount it on a heavy, sturdy tripod.
    I have a very sturdy camera stand and a tripod. I'm just in love with the negatives!

  9. #19

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    If you want to get really low, you can make a version of something we call a "high hat" in film production. For us it's the crown that a head mounts to bolted to a plank of plywood. Since the head for a still camera mounts so simply, you can simply bolt your head to a piece of plywood and you're done. If you drill holds in the center as well as a couple inches from a corner, you'll preserve the ability to be low while still being able to tilt sharply down without seeing the plank.

    Here's a film camera on a high-hat:


  10. #20
    Jenni's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PanaDP View Post
    If you want to get really low, you can make a version of something we call a "high hat" in film production. For us it's the crown that a head mounts to bolted to a plank of plywood. Since the head for a still camera mounts so simply, you can simply bolt your head to a piece of plywood and you're done. If you drill holds in the center as well as a couple inches from a corner, you'll preserve the ability to be low while still being able to tilt sharply down without seeing the plank.

    Here's a film camera on a high-hat:

    Brilliant!

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