Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,761   Posts: 1,516,104   Online: 905
      
Page 6 of 9 FirstFirst 123456789 LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 82
  1. #51

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,432
    Brad - I notice you're a hillbilly. I'm from them thar hills myself, though further south, between Yos
    and Kings Can. I worked a Sinar thru hundreds of backpacks in the Sierra and Rockies and desert and
    hardly consider them fragile - and if something goes wrong, the components can easily be replaced.
    Although I've mainly been into an 8x10 folder in recent years, I also recently refurbished a 4X5 Norma. This has a tapered bellows which works all the way from typical wide-angle (90 or so) clear
    up to 450 without changing the bellows like on the F series, and is physically a little more rugged too. I was lucky to find a very clean one. They are far quicker to operate in the field, and since I
    mainly gravitate toward long lenses, monorail is the ticket. I have a little Ebony folder when compactness and lightwt is more the priority. Walker, as I recall, was made of ABS and machined
    stainless, so would be pretty stiff and rugged, though with a penalty of weight, electrostatic attraction to dust, and limited bellows draw. However, I can't afford to try out as many cameras as
    you have!

  2. #52
    BradS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    S.F. Bay Area, California
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    3,932
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    Brad, some surprising (to me) things in your post.

    First, although I agree the Walker is pretty rigid, even in the front standard when fitted with my whopper 90mm XL, I'm quite surprised you're saying the F2 was less rigid. I'm assuming you mean there was more "flex" in the standards since they are base-supported?
    yes. exactly. They also have this wildly tall rail clamp that would drive you nuts. Not only because it is tall but, it also allows the camera rail to rotate...no way to "know" it is precisely aligned with anything.

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    All the Sinars are similar in that way, but is a P more rigid, or basically the same thing?
    I do not know - I've never owned nor seriously looked at a Sinar P.

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    What specifically would I find disappointing about an Arca - say an F-Metric or M-Monolith type? The factory alignment/detents are out?
    I hesitate to point out anything specific. I just chose this one because it is ridiculously expensive and parts are less commonly available. Again, if you're unhappy with the Walker Sf...then, you're not likely to be happy with any other field camera.

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    I looked into the Canham DLC2 when I was researching the Walker. Some people had reported rigidity issues, particularly with the back. No idea if that is correct or not. I had a hard time making that decision because the DLC and the Walker are really the only field cameras in that price range with that much flexibility. As you correctly pointed out, considering the Walker is a folding field camera, it is surprisingly easy to use with anything from a 90 to a 400 without even changing the bellows or using a recessed board. I purchased the recessed board and bag bellows, but even with a 72mm XL I don't need the recessed board.
    hmmm, a little background maybe in order. I am a software engineer. My work demands a level of attention to detail that can make a guy go insane. I do photography for fun. I really do not worry to much about anything with respect to photography. Quite the contrary in fact. So my love for the Canham is not based upon its technical perfection. The thing I love about the Canham DLC45 and the Walker SF45 is the engineering and craftsmanship. They are both just fantastic in terms of design, materials and workmanship. They do not compare in terms of rigidity or strength however. The Canham has a lot of flex (but it always returns to where it is supposed to be). Lots of folks complain about this. I can go on and on gushing over the Canham...but, it definitely is not the right camera for you.

    I also have an Ebony RW45. Great camera and the only LF camera that I bought new. I've never even considered selling it. It is also a masterpiece of craftsmanship and the materials are unparalleled. The design however does not stray far from the beaten path - I do appreciate its subtle refinements to the ordinary fold up field camera design. I especially like that it has both base and axis tilts on front and back and that the front rise/fall is independent of the front tilt. I've had this one a long time and have traveled with it quite a bit. It is a great camera but, I get no buzz when I set it up. It just works.

    The only other LF camera I have right now is a Crown Graphic...which I use handheld. Wonderful camera, every LF photographer should have one.




    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    Brad - I notice you're a hillbilly. I'm from them thar hills myself, though further south, between Yos and Kings Can. I worked a Sinar thru hundreds of backpacks in the Sierra and Rockies and desert and hardly consider them fragile - and if something goes wrong, the components can easily be replaced. Although I've mainly been into an 8x10 folder in recent years, I also recently refurbished a 4X5 Norma. This has a tapered bellows which works all the way from typical wide-angle (90 or so) clear up to 450 without changing the bellows like on the F series, and is physically a little more rugged too. I was lucky to find a very clean one. They are far quicker to operate in the field, and since I mainly gravitate toward long lenses, monorail is the ticket. I have a little Ebony folder when compactness and light wt is more the priority. Walker, as I recall, was made of ABS and machined stainless, so would be pretty stiff and rugged, though with a penalty of weight, electrostatic attraction to dust, and limited bellows draw. However, I can't afford to try out as many cameras as you have!
    Hmm, I just counted and could only come up with 17..and five of those are speed/crown graphics. I only have three now...and that is plenty (too many in some respects). I think the Sinar F2 was about the third 4x5 camera I bought. Got it in 9+ condition from Lens and Repo...paid about twice what it was actually worth and built up a nice kit. It is and extraordinary system camera and kit is still plentiful. They're rally nice cameras...the F2 just made me realize that I'm not a monorail guy. That was the last monorail I ever owned. I should say that I wasn't searching for the perfect camera...there is no such thing. I just like to try things out to see how they work. When times were better there used to be extra money to waste on such idle fancy...not so any more.

    oh, and yeah, I love it up in the Sierra. I'm just above 3100 feet so not too much snow but not too far from it when i want to be there.

  3. #53
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    the villages .centralflorida,USA and Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,344
    Images
    1
    i just checkeed my linhof technikardan, and it is as paralell as i can measure, nanyway, i would stear anybody interestedin top qualityimage-taking equipment,coming from 35mm,away from 4x5 and towards mediumformat. the image quality increase is gigantic and the equipment reliability and mechanical perfection traditionaleg. hasselblad and the like, more quality per $as far as i'm concerned!
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  4. #54

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,432
    The image quality step up from MF to 4x5 is even greater than that from 35mm to MF. Yeah, one
    can machine a very precise system with a MF SLR or rangefinder, but that's because you
    give up all the movements which make a view camera so much more versatile (except speed of setup
    and operation). Comparing apples to apples, I can even put a rollfilm back on my 4x5 and get much
    sharper images than with the same film in any SLR simply because I can control the plane of focus
    using tilts and swings. With a conventional MF camera all you can do is stop the lens down until diffraction spoils optimum lens performance. If someone wants to learn LF technique they should just
    set aside their smaller equip for awhile and get used to it. I ain't all that hard to learn the tricks.
    What I can't figure out is how to take a picture with a cell phone - I still don't know where to attach
    the darkcloth!

  5. #55

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,490
    I think we're looking at things from different perspectives. I want something accurate/precise and strong. I don't care how it was engineered or how novel it is or what it looks like or anything like that. I don't get any buzz whatsoever from the camera itself. Actually I suppose that's not entirely true. Once upon a time I did kind of get a buzz when I used Leicas, but I got over that.


    Quote Originally Posted by BradS View Post
    yes. exactly. They also have this wildly tall rail clamp that would drive you nuts. Not only because it is tall but, it also allows the camera rail to rotate...no way to "know" it is precisely aligned with anything.


    I do not know - I've never owned nor seriously looked at a Sinar P.


    I hesitate to point out anything specific. I just chose this one because it is ridiculously expensive and parts are less commonly available. Again, if you're unhappy with the Walker Sf...then, you're not likely to be happy with any other field camera.



    hmmm, a little background maybe in order. I am a software engineer. My work demands a level of attention to detail that can make a guy go insane. I do photography for fun. I really do not worry to much about anything with respect to photography. Quite the contrary in fact. So my love for the Canham is not based upon its technical perfection. The thing I love about the Canham DLC45 and the Walker SF45 is the engineering and craftsmanship. They are both just fantastic in terms of design, materials and workmanship. They do not compare in terms of rigidity or strength however. The Canham has a lot of flex (but it always returns to where it is supposed to be). Lots of folks complain about this. I can go on and on gushing over the Canham...but, it definitely is not the right camera for you.

    I also have an Ebony RW45. Great camera and the only LF camera that I bought new. I've never even considered selling it. It is also a masterpiece of craftsmanship and the materials are unparalleled. The design however does not stray far from the beaten path - I do appreciate its subtle refinements to the ordinary fold up field camera design. I especially like that it has both base and axis tilts on front and back and that the front rise/fall is independent of the front tilt. I've had this one a long time and have traveled with it quite a bit. It is a great camera but, I get no buzz when I set it up. It just works.

    The only other LF camera I have right now is a Crown Graphic...which I use handheld. Wonderful camera, every LF photographer should have one.






    Hmm, I just counted and could only come up with 17..and five of those are speed/crown graphics. I only have three now...and that is plenty (too many in some respects). I think the Sinar F2 was about the third 4x5 camera I bought. Got it in 9+ condition from Lens and Repo...paid about twice what it was actually worth and built up a nice kit. It is and extraordinary system camera and kit is still plentiful. They're rally nice cameras...the F2 just made me realize that I'm not a monorail guy. That was the last monorail I ever owned. I should say that I wasn't searching for the perfect camera...there is no such thing. I just like to try things out to see how they work. When times were better there used to be extra money to waste on such idle fancy...not so any more.

    oh, and yeah, I love it up in the Sierra. I'm just above 3100 feet so not too much snow but not too far from it when i want to be there.

  6. #56
    BradS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    S.F. Bay Area, California
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    3,932
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    I think we're looking at things from different perspectives. I want something accurate/precise and strong. I don't care how it was engineered or how novel it is or what it looks like or anything like that. I don't get any buzz whatsoever from the camera itself. Actually I suppose that's not entirely true. Once upon a time I did kind of get a buzz when I used Leicas, but I got over that.
    Yes. I understand. That is exactly why I thought it worthwhile to provide some background.
    (because you mentioned looking at the DLC...which I don't think would suit you well but suits me very well).

  7. #57

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,490
    Well, I guess selling most likely be selling the Walker. I guess I will first ask Mr. Walker if he will take the camera back for a refund. I assume he will not. I had already sent it back to him to be "re-aligned" and he said it was within spec, and was even within spec before I sent it back, but I'm just not happy, 2 grand later. A shame to flip a brand new camera.

  8. #58

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,963
    Michael... did Walker ever indicate what "the spec" is?

  9. #59

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,490
    No.

    I thought of something neat though. Someone could mount four lasers on the rear standard (one along each dimension) pointing forward toward the front standard. The lasers would be attached to a small digital readout that told you (continuously) the distance each laser was measuring (and the equivalent tilt/swing in degrees). If the four distances are all the same everything is parallel.

    Just kidding.

  10. #60

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,963
    Srue that can be done. How many digits do you want in the display?



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin