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  1. #61
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    My Linhof Tech V--purchased used but serviced by Marflex--does set up quickly and easily with everything solid and zeroed and the infinity stops placed accurately, but if you buy a used one, it is wise to have it checked by authorized service. If you like wide lenses and don't plan to use the rangefinder, consider a Tech 2000 or 3000.

    I have a Sinar P, and as great a camera as it is, there's a lot that can go out of alignment, so you may not be happy with it. The levels are adjustable, for instance.

    A great tool I have for turning any kind of floppy wooden field camera into a reasonably precise instrument is a Suunto Clinometer-Compass:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...tag=davagol-20

    You can use it to set the front and rear standards to plumb, whatever the angle of the base (so you can use it for indirect rise/fall), or to transfer movements from the rear to the front standard like with a Sinar P, or use it to level the base, and use the compass to adjust the swing axis, as long as there are no magnetic parts on your camera.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  2. #62

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    Yes, those little portable pendulum inclinometers tend to be a lot more practical then bubble levels. I keep one in my architect photog kit. Makes life simple with almost any kind of view camera.

  3. #63

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    I have a pendulum inclinometer and a digital one too ("tilt box"). Unfortunately that doesn't help horizontal parallelism. For me that's the real problem. Vertical is easier to manage.

  4. #64

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    If the inclinometer has 90-degree sides it will work for both applications. Many do. The larger the better (at some expense to portability). But I'd check any of em against a machinist quality square and level first if requirements are critical.

  5. #65

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    I don't get it. How would a pendulum device tell you swing angles?

  6. #66
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    I don't get it. How would a pendulum device tell you swing angles?
    It won't.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  7. #67

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    Well you couldn't calculate swings; but all it takes is a little calibrated angle bevel gage to do that,
    which weighs next to nothing. The pendulum gadget gives you reference to vertical. I don't know why anyone would specifically have to match front and rear swing anyway unless they had no shift option - probably the least used function in my experience.

  8. #68
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Michael R 1974, after reading this thread I have come to the conclusion you do need a different camera. I did not realize the Walker had no zero detents; that is too bad. I use a Horseman FA which has the same front standard as the medium format VH-R. When this camera is set on the zero detents it has to compete with the likes of Hassleblad and other solid-mount medium format cameras in terms of lens alignment. Since the FA is a Linhof copy, I suspect the Linhof is similar.

  9. #69
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    4x5 cameras with truly parallel/aligned standards

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    I have a pendulum inclinometer and a digital one too ("tilt box"). Unfortunately that doesn't help horizontal parallelism. For me that's the real problem. Vertical is easier to manage.
    A clinometer-compass like the one I use also has a compass for swing angle or horizontal parallelism, as long as nothing on your camera is magnetic.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  10. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    Yes, those little portable pendulum inclinometers tend to be a lot more practical then bubble levels. I keep one in my architect photog kit. Makes life simple with almost any kind of view camera.
    It may be dragging this discussion into the 21st century but does nobody here have an iPod or an iPhone? 'Apps' for bubble levels and inclinometers are free!

    Steve
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_barnett/

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    wood, water, rock,
    landscape photographs in and around the Peak District National Park, UK.



 

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