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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Len Middleton View Post
    But the metal bits that tie together the various wooden bits can...

    As they have on my 50 year old Deadorff V8. The rust may cause structural problems for my camera maybe in another 100 years, but not expecting that to be a problem that I will have to deal with at that time...
    One problem.There's nothing to rust on that camera. Stainless steel, brass, phosphor bronze, and cast aluminium rear standards on the very earliest V8os models. The only carbon steel parts on the entire camera are the pinion shafts for front and rear focussing... and they're nickel plated.
    So what's rusting on yours?

  2. #32
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    The bigger problem beyond stressing about the final .001% of perfection in the machine is what are you going to put in front of it that anybody wants to look at?
    He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep..to gain that which he cannot lose. Jim Elliot, 1949

    http://tonopahpictures.0catch.com

  3. #33

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    Per hardware: even all the metal on my wooden tripods is nonferrous. I wouldn't buy one otherwise.
    In the good ole days a decent view camera would have machined forged brass gears etc. The cheapo knockoff cameras often used far inferior cast brass. Expensive non-wooden cameras typically used forged aluminum alloy. Later CNC techniques made surface-anodized aircraft aluminum popular for non-gear components - it was lightwt and cost efficient. Canham did a fine job with this. But the hard anodizing is only a few microns thick, so it's a tradeoff. Stainless steel or silicon bronze are excellent materials for hardware but heavy. Titanium, like Ebony uses, is a superb lightwt alternative, and far superior to brass or alum of any description, but expensive.

  4. #34

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    Gosh Jim - come over here to the coast where the air is saturated with salt, and you'll see what all
    the fuss is about! The kind of alloy is a big deal on everything, not just cameras! Right now I'm sitting about thirty feet from a room full of about a million dollars worth of stainless, bronze, and
    ceramic-coated fasteners. This also affects material choice in general.

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    True. I think the camera that Michael is looking at right now, though, the Ebony, has metal parts made of titanium, which of course are very corrosion resistant.
    My old Osaka 4x5 camera had metal parts made of nickel plated brass, which is also very good with respect to corrosion.
    ...looking at the Ebony - but not buying. I knew they were expensive but yikes. No way I can afford it. I'll do the best I can with my Walker for now.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    ...looking at the Ebony - but not buying. I knew they were expensive but yikes. No way I can afford it. I'll do the best I can with my Walker for now.
    Michael,

    I loved the camera I used to own: http://stores.photoformulary.com/-st...era/Detail.bok

    It was gorgeous, and easy to set up. It does fold, however, so probably not your cup of tea.

    - T
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  7. #37

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    I think I'll stick with the Walker for now since I've already made the investment.

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    One problem.There's nothing to rust on that camera. Stainless steel, brass, phosphor bronze, and cast aluminium rear standards on the very earliest V8os models. The only carbon steel parts on the entire camera are the pinion shafts for front and rear focussing... and they're nickel plated.
    So what's rusting on yours?
    E,

    I seem to remember on my FS V8 (ca. 1954) there is a carbon steel bracket that the front standard bracket is mounted onto, and that has some surface rust.

    As it is about 7 time zones away, I am unable to examine it and describe it more accurately...

    Len

  9. #39

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    Nickel isn't a very durable finish around salt air either; and some desert conditions can be even more
    corrosive. Nickel was a cheap soft plating popular on brass and pot metal in the 40's and 50's. It amazes me that it's back in vogue on bathroom and kitchen fixtures today. Chrome is a lot more durable, though obviously nowhere near as good as stainless or titanium. It is possible nowadays to
    apply clear titanium coatings over brass which are tougher than nickel. But I doubt any cottage operation like a wooden camera manufacturer would go to that trouble. Easier just to select a better
    alloy to begin with.

  10. #40

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    I went with a Shen Hao XPO. There was no way that I could justify the price of an Ebony. Then again, I could set it up on a tripod in my living room so that I can admire it. Then half the cost could count towards art.

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