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  1. #11

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    Another vote for the Canham. I have been shooting with the Canham Traditional 810 for six years now since my hands couldn't work the round knobs on my Wisner Tech Field any longer. The Canham is a magnificent camera. Plenty of movements, easy to use and fold, and easy to maintain with a few hex wrenches. Less bellows draw, but then how often does one need to go 4x life size? I've just gotten a 5x7 with 45 only back as the combined camera/holders/tripod weight of 810 has gotten to be a bit much for me in the field, and I want to use the view camera outside more. I'll keep going with the 810 from time to time, and indoors/studio. I couldn't decide between the Wisner and the Canham when I replaced my rickety old B&J 810, wish I'd gone right for the Canham today.

    Keith is also part of the reason I recommend Canhams - he is a wonderful guy who really cares about what he does and goes the extra mile with us users. He's got my 810 in for a CLA right now. After a long life and a stupid mistake I'd messed up the front focus rod. Repair was no big deal, parts are there. But he saw something wrong with it that I hadn't noticed and fixed that also. Every time I've called we've had a nice chat about the camera and more.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by LJH View Post
    Do you mean lenses (i.e. plural)? If not, I'd be spending money on second (and possibly third) lenses. If so, have you really got the best lenses that you can buy? The box is so much less important than the glass IMO. $5k gets some absolute cracker lenses, especially in the used market!
    I currently have one lens I have been working with for portraits which is a Darlot Paris. It is actually an old Magic Lamp lens, but I have removed the rear element, and flipped the lens over to get full 8x10 coverage. It is one of the best portrait lenses I have worked with for what I like to do. I also have some (no name) 12" lens that I have been using for landscape work. I’m in the process of researching the Nikkor-M 450 f/9 with Copal #3 for my landscape stuff. I would be very interested in any input you have on lenses as well. That was going to be another thread, but if you can help me here, that would be great.
    Rick Lanning
    Retired Crime Scene Photog.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by sepiareverb View Post
    Another vote for the Canham. I have been shooting with the Canham Traditional 810 for six years now since my hands couldn't work the round knobs on my Wisner Tech Field any longer. The Canham is a magnificent camera. Plenty of movements, easy to use and fold, and easy to maintain with a few hex wrenches. Less bellows draw, but then how often does one need to go 4x life size? I've just gotten a 5x7 with 45 only back as the combined camera/holders/tripod weight of 810 has gotten to be a bit much for me in the field, and I want to use the view camera outside more. I'll keep going with the 810 from time to time, and indoors/studio. I couldn't decide between the Wisner and the Canham when I replaced my rickety old B&J 810, wish I'd gone right for the Canham today.

    Keith is also part of the reason I recommend Canhams - he is a wonderful guy who really cares about what he does and goes the extra mile with us users. He's got my 810 in for a CLA right now. After a long life and a stupid mistake I'd messed up the front focus rod. Repair was no big deal, parts are there. But he saw something wrong with it that I hadn't noticed and fixed that also. Every time I've called we've had a nice chat about the camera and more.
    The idea of that kind of personal service for repair work is actually very big for me. Thanks for the info on the Canham, I will have to look them up.
    Rick Lanning
    Retired Crime Scene Photog.

  4. #14
    LJH
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    Quote Originally Posted by vintagepics View Post
    The idea of that kind of personal service for repair work is actually very big for me. Thanks for the info on the Canham, I will have to look them up.
    Richard Ritter is an amazing guy for service. He is the go-to guy for having things fixed and/or modified.

    Canhams seem like good cameras. However, just make sure you understand that they are not a normal/traditional design. Their setup/breakdown is different to what you're used to.

    As for lenses, the Nikkor is amazing. I have one for ULF stuff. I'd also look at the Nikkor 120mm as an ultra wide for 8x10. There's a massive amount of info on lenses both here and on LFPF.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by LJH View Post
    Richard Ritter is an amazing guy for service. He is the go-to guy for having things fixed and/or modified.
    Richard also manufactures new large and ultra large format cameras. If I was in the market for an 8x10 I would take a close look at Richards cameras.

    http://www.lg4mat.net/LFcamera.html

    Roger

  6. #16

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    Richard also manufactures new large and ultra large format cameras. If I was in the market for an 8x10 I would take a close look at Richards cameras.
    +1
    If I were to buy a new 8x10, it would be one of Richard's.

  7. #17

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    I've dealt with Richard too, and just recommended him a few days ago to a friend who wants some modifications done to her Kodak 2D. Richard is another one who is top notch.

    I haven't handled his camera so can't comment directly on that.

  8. #18
    Roger Thoms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sepiareverb View Post
    I've dealt with Richard too, and just recommended him a few days ago to a friend who wants some modifications done to her Kodak 2D. Richard is another one who is top notch.

    I haven't handled his camera so can't comment directly on that.
    No I haven't handled his camera either but if I was in the market I would take a serious look at them. Canham would be right up there too. Right now Richard has my 5x7 Charten for major repairs, one one those Ebay impulse buys, it's getting new bellows, a missing knob, and new rack and pinion gears. Should be nice when when it's done.

    Roger

  9. #19

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    I might be going slightly off topic here but I've had my Ritter 8x10 for about a year now and for the wide landscapes I like to take, I haven't found another 8x10 folder that comes close to giving me the same degree of flexibility. With a 90mm lens covering 4x10 panoramas, this camera allows the lens to be centred in either the upper or lower half of the GG, with some serious base tilt to keep the rails out of the frame. It lives with it's wide angle bellows attached and its base rails configured for wide angle work, and can still be folded and put into a pack with no problems. If I wanted to use a longer lens I can go up to 300mm without having to rejig everything.

    It's not perfect - lacking some of the engineering refinement of other cameras and it does throw up some problems when using it to the extreme but I chose it for a specific purpose that other cameras would, I suspect struggle with.

    M2CW...
    /Frank...

  10. #20

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    And you did say field camera, so while I do not know how heavy a Canham is, I know that the 8x10 Ritter weighs a whole lot less than by 8x10 Deardorff V8.

    Not certain if that is important to you...

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