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  1. #21

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    it is easy to test if the film was not coated for some reason. Take a sheet out of the box, turn on the lights and look at it. Film emulsion looks like emulsion -- grayish or bluish, depending on what kind it is. maybe gray. certainly not clear.

    then in broad daylight put the film in developer, then fixer. should go totally black.

    if not, ur doing something wrong but you don't sound like someone to make a newbie mistake.

  2. #22

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    Also pay attention that you're pulling the correct dark slide. It's easy to pull the most accessible one on the outside. Just last week I pulled the wrong one, flashing a whole sheet of film that was luckily otherwise unexposed. I noticed it and didn't lose a shot for it but I still felt silly.

    If you suspect your shutter/strobe sync, set up the camera and a head or two just looking at a wall. Make it fairly dark without the strobe pop. Get under the dark cloth and look at the groundglass. You should be able to tell if the shutter is open while the strobes pop.

  3. #23

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    Did you load the film into the film holders Backwards so the emulsion is facing away from the lens?

  4. #24
    Stephanie Brim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbeech View Post
    Did you load the film into the film holders Backwards so the emulsion is facing away from the lens?
    That should show at least some exposure. The film wouldn't be completely clear.
    No idea what's going to happen next, but I'm hoping it involves being wrist deep in chemicals come the weekend.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    Does yur shutter have a X-M switch? If so, then X.
    Definitely can be a problem!

    I don't know if the Copal #1 has that switch -- perhaps the much older ones might? The newer ones do not have it as they were made way after the use of flash bulbs ended.

    For just general info (I know you know, Brian), the M setting delays the opening of the shutter to allow a flash bulb to build up to full power -- but with electronic strobes the shutter would open after the strobe has fired and died out. The X setting opens the shutter and fires the flash at the same time.

    But another way to test would be (if the ambiant light is not too bright compared to the strobes) is to open the shutter on B or T, then manually fire the strobes, then close the lens.

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  6. #26
    dsk
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    Does yur shutter have a X-M switch? If so, then X.
    that was the culprit

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by dsk View Post
    that was the culprit
    Glad you found it.

    You're not alone, and there are many ways to make that mistake. I think mine was the most bizarre. I broke my Nikkormat FTN's x post, took it to Comet Camera Repair in Philadelphia to be repaired. They gave the camera back with the m contacts wired to the x post and the x contacts wired to the m post. I went off on my honeymoon to Costa Rica, took some nice night shots with flash including a series of a female opossum with babies. All with the flash cable connected to the x post, all lost. <curses deleted>.

    This was in '76. I hope Comet, if they are still in business, have improved since then.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by dsk View Post
    i feel like im going insane I have shot 4 different shots from this pack of fp4 developed it in 3 different developers no lettering nothing on these sheets im totally lost as to what could be happening I have tried everything any advice? is it at all possible they forgot to coat it or something!? this is perfectly fresh film too tested the shutter EVERYTHING film is 100% clear
    If there was no lettering, there was no development. I believe that Ilford uses edge lettering as well as EK and Fuji.

    PE

  9. #29
    LJH
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    Take a test shot and have a lab develop it?

  10. #30
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    If there was no lettering, there was no development. I believe that Ilford uses edge lettering as well as EK and Fuji.
    The OP was asking about individually loaded 4x5 sheets of film.

    Over the decades I've never seen film sheets in any format that incorporated edge lettering of any kind. Only the (very useful) notch patterns. But then, I've only ever used Kodak (4x5) and Ilford (4x5, 8x10) in individual cut sheets. Don't know first hand about any of the other manufacturers or packaging types.

    Do some add lettering?

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    —Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

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